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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

Wednesday, February 12, 1958

Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gardner Lattimer

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Lattimer for his letter expressing support for Dr. King and his work. He then talks about the importance of making the number of those seeking peace through non-violence known to the public and the government. King continues, commenting on the War in Vietnam and the international adoption of peace through non-violence.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Howard Johnson's Motor Inn

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Despite not having received their reservation for October 19, 1967, Dora McDonald sends her appreciation to the Howard Johnson Motor Inn for making accommodations. Ms. McDonald also encloses a copy of the confirmation order to show that reservations were, in fact, made for that night.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Monday, February 8, 1965

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Eugene Sands

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Eugene Sands to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Stanley Lavison to MLK Regarding Speeches

Thursday, March 17, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Stanley D. Levison references text books with Dr. King's speeches and The Chicago Rally.

Sermon Outline Notes - MLK

This document is an outline handwritten by Dr. King, who frequently wrote such outlines as a precursor to a sermon. The topic centers on man's talent and his reasons for using--or more importantly, not using--that talent.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Letter from William H. Shell to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962

William H. Shell is preparing an address for a high school graduation and is in need of various documents surrounding Dr. King's organization. Mr. Shell desires to know the detailed goals of the Civil Rights Movement, civil rights techniques, and the education demographics for the early 1960's.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Telegram from Lucious Outlaw to MLK

Dr. King notifies Mr. Lucious Outlaw that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Fisk University.

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

Friday, October 4, 1957

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.