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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Letter from Charles V. Arthur to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963

Charles V. Arthur of Vancouver's Kitsilano Secondary School encloses a contribution for the SCLC. He explains that the staff wishes to show appreciation for the efforts of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Letter from the American Broadcasting Company to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963

Kay Murphy, Manager of ABC's Literary Rights Division, thanks Dr. King for giving permission to the television network to quote from "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on the program "Directions '64." She also provides information about the specific program, which is a religious series focusing on "the current Negro crisis in America."

Letter from Paul Frumkin to MLK about Kup's Show

Monday, March 27, 1967

This letter, dated March 27, 1967, was written from Paul Frumkin to Dr. King. Paul Frumkin, producer of American Broadcasting Company's "Kup's Show," thanks Dr. King for making an appearance on "Kup's Show."

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Letter from Bret Harte Junior High School to MLK

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

The eighth grade class from Bret Harte Junior High School writes to Dr.King to inquire about his opinion on race relations. The students expressed that they believed that Negros deserve equal rights.

Letter to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

Death of Dr. King

This photo was taken after Dr. King's assassination and contains slogans in support for the fallen leader.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

War

Dr. King cites a quote concerning "war" from Oswald Spengler's "The Return of the Caesars," an article featured in The American Mercury.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Mrs. Preston acknowledges receipt of letter from Dora McDonald regarding the possibility of Dr. King speaking at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention. Due to the Sorority's intense desire to have Dr. King as the speaker, Ms. Preston is willing to wait for the confirmation.

Memo on Food Crisis in India

Monday, March 20, 1967

Rodney H. Clurman, Executive Secretary of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, writes this memorandum to committee members. Clurman sends this status report on the state of food affairs in India. He references a letter received from John Taylor who lives in Bihar, India and works for the Ford Foundation.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from Thomas N. Schroth to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Thomas N. Schroth, from the Congressional Quaterly Service, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the National Press Club.

Letter from Darnell Garner to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Darnell Garner offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death, and he invites her to a mass at his church

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

Letter from Anna Gallaspy to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Anna Gallaspy, Production Director of the Immanuel United Church of Christ in Los Angeles, extends an invitation for Dr. King and members of the SCLC to review their outline of a youth festival pilot program.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This pamphlet produced by the Southern Christian Leadership Council promotes the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D. C. for the spring of 1968.

Martin Luther King's Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Facts and Activity Program of the Swedish Organization developed "The Martin Luther King Fund" to raise money in support of Dr. King. The group has raised funds through the sale of tickets and recordings at the Stockholm Opera.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.

Letter from MLK to W. David Angus

Monday, October 14, 1963

This letter is in response to Mr. W. David Angus from Dr. King, referencing an invite to speak in Montreal. However, Dr. King acknowledged that he would be out of the country.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.