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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Letter from James Dodd to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

James Dodd of the Sacramento NAACP invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker for their Life Membership Awards Banquet. The theme of the dinner is "The Man and the Times."

Letter from George Garabedian & Co. to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

George Garabedian writes Dr. King, pleased that he will be able to accommodate him and his group on their pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

Nobel Foundation Code of Statutes

Friday, June 29, 1900

This 1900 document sets forth the purpose of the Nobel Foundation as worded in the will of Dr. Alfred Bernhard Nobel. According to these statutes, the Peace Award is for the person who has "best promoted the Fraternity of Nations and the Abolishment or Diminution of Standing Armies and the Formation and Increase of Peace-Congresses."

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

Tuesday, October 13, 1964

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Healing Treatment from Aurora Maynard to Coretta S. King

Aurora Maynard sends her support to Mrs. Coretta Scott King in the form of a self-authored poem entitled "Healing Treatment."

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Letter from Mrs. F.B. Farquharson to Dr. Martin Luther King about an SCLC Memo

Friday, August 12, 1966

Mrs. F.B. Farquharson expresses her gratitude after reading a letter and memo that was sent from Dr. King and the SCLC staff that deeply moved her in a manner in which she feels compelled to share the contents of both with a few of her comrades.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from Sonia Schechter to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Sonia Schechter, President of Jewish Cultural Clubs and Societies, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC. Schechter also expresses great admiration to Dr. King for his "heroic leadership."

Invitation from the Ambassador of Ethiopia to MLK

The Ambassador of Ethiopia extends an invitation for Dr. King to attend a reception honoring Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 13, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee, attempts to reschedule an event previously canceled by Dr. King. Shaefer informs Dr. King's secretary, Ms. McDonald, of the hundreds of people that purchased tickets to attend the event and their desire to have it rescheduled.

Letter from P. G. Harkins to MLK

Mrs. Harkins, program chairman of the Voice of Women, requests that Dr. King speak for the organization when his schedule permits.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.

Letter from Claudie Erleigh to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

On behalf of the NUSAS Local Committee, Claudie Erleigh writes Dr. King requesting that he submit an article for the "NUSAS Journal." Dr. King's entry would extend further beyond the "general interest." The committee has also invited other influential leaders, such as Senator Robert F. Kennedy, to contribute to this journal.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from Randall Elias to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Randall Elias offers the support of himself and the North Shore Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action for the civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield.