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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

Letter from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

The Board of Missions of the Methodist Church, on behalf of the Methodist Church of Brazil, invites Dr. King to speak at the centennial celebration of Methodist missionary work in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. McCoy also provides a brief history of the Methodist Church of Brazil.

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Letter from Peter Seeger to MLK

American folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Seeger shares with Dr. King a previous experience appearing on a television program in Tokyo. Seeger recommends the program as an excellent means to communicate with the Japanese people.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.

Letter from Wilbert McDonald to MLK regarding Scholarship Assistance

Wednesday, June 9, 1965

Wilber McDonald requests advice about the development of his educational career from Dr. King.

Letter from Leon Despres to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Leon M. Despres, Alderman of the Fifth Ward of Chicago, welcomes Dr. King to the city. Despres expresses his appreciation for King's visit and encourages as much help as possible to help rid Chicago of their current system of segregation.

Letter from the Inmates of Cook County Jail to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

The inmates of Cook County Jail request Dr. King's help in fighting certain injustices in the criminal system. The writer informs Dr. King that he may contact Ms. Juanita Whiltfield for more details.

Letter from Topsy Eubanks to the SCLC

The Council of Christian Women Voters in Augusta, Georgia sends the SCLC a contribution and informs the organization of their desire to become an SCLC affiliate.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Letter from Rev. C. J. Bell to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Rev. C. J. Bell, the Editor in Chief of the Alexandria News Leader and pastor of the Progressive Baptist Church, wrote this letter to Dr. Ralph David Abernathy expressing his support following Dr. King's assassination. Abernathy was named Dr. King's successor as president of the SCLC and Bell wishes to offer his help if he can be of service.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

Sketch of MLK by Charles Keller

Thursday, May 7, 1959

This document features a 1959 sketch of Dr. King, signed, "In admiration," by Mr. Charles Keller.

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

Buddhism

Dr. King quotes James Bissett Pratt's "The Religious Consciousness: A Psychological Study."

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.