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"UZBEKISTAN"

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Old Age

Dr. King discusses the topic of old age. He references French poet Victor Hugo quoting, "winter was on his head but eternal spring was in his heart."

SCLC Press Release

Monday, May 16, 1966

This press release announces Dr. King's election as a Fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The statement provides a brief history of the research center, including its affiliation with prestigious figures such as President John Adams and American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson. The release concludes with a brief biography of Dr. King.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Tuesday, October 27, 1959

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Letter from Wilford Tallie to Dr. King

Friday, January 28, 1966

Wilford Tallie, a Veteran at the West Side Veteran's Hospital, expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.

Montesquieu

Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Social Gospel

Dr. King describes the period of the social gospel.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to MLK

Monday, November 22, 1965

Carey McWilliams, Editor of "The Nation," reminds Dr. King that it is nearly time to publish his annual article. McWilliams also requests that the timing of the article correspond with the beginning of the new session of Congress.

We Salute You!

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Telegram from Nobel Committee to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

The Nobel Committee of Norwegian Parliament notifies Dr. King that he will be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Quote from AFL-CIO President George Meany

This is a picture of George Meany, President of AFL-CIO, giving an address to the Jewish Labor Committee meeting in Atlantic City, NJ on March 26, 1960. The picture is inscribed with a quote which reads: "What we want for ourselves, we want for all humanity."

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Senator Leroy Johnson

Thursday, October 10, 1963

Milton A. Reid, a candidate for State Senate, invites Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to a banquet at Virginia State College. The event will benefit the campaign expenses and feature guest speaker Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's assistant.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Letter from MLK to Delta Sigma Theta

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter is in response to and appreciation of a contribution in the amount of $150 made, to the SCLC, by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Telegram from Harry G. Boyte to Rev. John Papandrew

Harry Boyte expresses his happiness that Rev. John Papandrew will be working with the SCLC.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Frank Elliott

Monday, February 4, 1963

Dora McDonald responded to Frank Elliott's letter regarding Dr. King's schedule. Additionally, She requested for Elliott to send out an annoucement to people who had been requesting Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Telegram to Dr. Wyatt T Walker

Thursday, November 2, 1967

The Members of the Brotherhood of Faith offer support to Dr. Wyatt T. Walker while in the Jefferson County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.