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"UZBEKISTAN"

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter from William L. Hudson to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

William Hudson of the Commonwealth Club of California extends his gratitude to Dr. King for an address given to the Club.

SCLC Statement from Director of Communications

Monday, April 1, 1968

Tom Offenburger, SCLC spokesperson, releases a statement to the SCLC staff on future plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Memphis, Tennessee. Plans include marches and boycotts despite "brutal" actions on the behalf of Memphis police.

Letter from Robert Lee Hill to MLK

Robert Lee Hill writes to inform Dr. King of the discrimination taking place in the United States Post Office. He then requests the help of the Reverend to put an end to it.

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

Letter from Robert Finarelli to MLK

Wednesday, October 30, 1963

The staff of Edwin H. Vare Junior High School contributes to the SCLC "in remembrance of the Birmingham children who were victims of hate."

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter from Mrs. Charles Wilkinson to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Fund Committee of Aurora, Illinois sends $1,020 to help provide food, clothing and medicine for needy citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King writes this essay about the problems Habakkuk presents to Jehovah. He argues that God no longer judges humanity as a collective entity, but as individuals within humanity.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rennie Kiah

Friday, July 29, 1966

Dr. King and Dora McDonald express their gratitude for Mr. Rennie L. Kiah's suggestions. Mr. Kiah brings awareness to Dr. King about the "unkempt" property owned by the City of Atlanta. Dr. King attempts to contact the City Manager to clean up the property that is next to Ebenezer Church.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Confidential Memorandum

This handwritten document outlines plans for the SCLC's Direct Action program. The program will target Birmingham, Alabama, Montgomery, Alabama and Danville, Virginia.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Project Chicago Staff Meeting Minutes

Monday, July 3, 1967

This document recaps the minutes of the Project Chicago staff meeting held at West Side Christian Parish on July 3, 1967. Dr. King is listed as a proposed member of the Advisory Committee.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

Letter from Juniata College to MLK

Thursday, June 4, 1964

Robert E. Faus of Juniata College address Dora McDonald concerning the possibility of securing Dr. King for their religious convocation. Mr. Faus inquires about the status of Dr. King's schedule for the school year.

Theology

Dr. King asserts that religion and theology must coincide with one another because, "religion without theology is blind; theology without religion is empty."

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.

Request for Land Reform Bill

An anonymous writer asks Dr. King to petition Congress for a reform bill that would allow all people, irrespective of race, creed or societal status, to own land.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Letter from Jonathan B. Bingham to MLK

Thursday, February 17, 1966

Congressman Bingham of New York replies to Dr. King's donation solicitation letter requesting a renewal of the previous year's fifty dollar contribution to SCLC. The congressman states that he would like to know whether contributions will be used to influence foreign policy before committing to a decision.