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"VENEZUELA"

Letter from Curtis Addings to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about an Autograph

Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Curtis Addings requests three autographs from Dr. King.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Operation Breadbasket Pamphlet

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

This pamphlet describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Operation Breadbasket initiative.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 17, 1957
Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, GREECE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Estimated Budget

This document drafts out SCLC's estimated budget for the 1964-1965 fiscal year.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Vernon W. Stone

Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King commends Dr. Vernon Stone on his superb teaching career and upcoming move to become the first Negro professor at a University in Atlanta.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

Thursday, December 15, 1966
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, CANADA, INDIA, SWEDEN, NORWAY, ISRAEL

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, asks Dr. King if he would consider becoming a sponsor for the organization.

United States Commission on Civil Rights Information Bulletin

Monday, February 1, 1965
Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Colorado (CO), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

This information bulletin published by the US Commission on Civil Rights provides updates of current activities. The bulletin includes information regarding voting rights hearings, education in the south, and news from private organizations like CORE, NAACP and the Council for Civil Unity.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's concept of religion.

Gift from James Allen to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter, James Allen, of International Publishers, presents to Dr. King a copy of "The Autobiography of W.E.B. DuBois."

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Roy Wilkins sends a message of warm wishes on behalf of the NAACP to Dr. King while he is serving a sentence at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from Robert Bialek to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King informs Mr. Bialek of a creative arts festival named "The Artists of Conscience." Local artists who are not in favor of the administrative policy in Vietnam initiated the festival. Mr. Bialek also requests that Dr. King send him a list of Negro artists who may be interested in participating in the festival.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from Leslie Orear to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Leslie Orear requests Dr. King's assistance with judging the eight candidates for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

New Jersey (NJ)

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

January Program of the Emancipation Celebration

Monday, January 2, 1961
Georgia (GA)

This program of the Emancipation Celebration in Savannah, Georgia features Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Healing Treatment from Aurora Maynard to Coretta S. King

Aurora Maynard sends her support to Mrs. Coretta Scott King in the form of a self-authored poem entitled "Healing Treatment."

Note Explaining Reason for Coming to Los Angeles

Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

This document explains that Dr. King came to Los Angeles at the invitation of major organizations and concerned individuals.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Texas (TX), KENYA, UGANDA

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Letter from Leonard Spacek to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Leonard Spacek of Arthur Andersen & Co. thanks Dr. King for recent comments about open housing in Chicago.

SNCC Annual Conference Program 1960

Sunday, October 16, 1960
Atlanta, GA

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee concludes their annual conference with a rally featuring prominent student leaders. This program outlines the itinerary for the last event of the three day conference and includes SNCC's Statement of Purpose.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Sermon Outline

This document outlines sermon notes and ideas. Dr. King references passages from the book of Luke. He also wonders what Christ did to give people hope when their desires had not been reached. King also discusses that Jesus conquers time, where as, human beings are victims of time.