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"VENEZUELA"

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

Thursday, April 27, 1961

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from Betty White to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Betty White, president of The Young Matrons of True Light Baptist Church, invites Mrs. King to be a guest speaker and soloist at an upcoming civil rights program.

The Other America

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Friday, November 30, 1962

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

The Great Empire During the Sojourn In Egypt

Dr. King contemplates the history of Egypt, noting that little is known about the time the Israelites spent there. At some point "Asiatic peoples," the Hyksos, invade Egypt and built a powerful empire known as the area of Syria and Palestine. Using horse and chariot technology the Hyksos conquered the land. Eventually, native rulers of Thebes in upper Egypt drove out the Hyksos.

Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Weatherhead on Love

Dr. King records a quote from Leslie Dixon Weatherhead's "Why Men Suffer."

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, February 12, 1966

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Headquarters Torched After Milwaukee March

This article discusses the destruction of the Freedom House, home of the Milwaukee Youth Council of the N.A.A.C.P. The Freedom House was destroyed by a firebomb, which entered through the front window. Young Negro housing demonstrators attempted to hold a rally on the southside of Milwaukee in support of an open housing ordinance, only to return to a destroyed headquarters. This article was written by Milwaukee's Associated Press.

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Letter from Gwedolyn Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1962

Gwedolyn Johnson of Friendship Baptist invites Dr. King to a public speaking engagement held on his behalf. She encourages Dr. King to speak directly to the youth in an effort to increase moral and social activism. She requests a specific date in addition to estimated traveling costs.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Memorandum from John Gunther to Urban Coalition Steering Committee

Monday, December 11, 1967

John Gunther submits a report to the members of the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition stating that the Urban Coalition should be concerned with issues related to education, employment and housing. The memorandum outlines the job of the Council of Local Coalitions and states that the Steering Committee may add to the Coalition's numbers at any time. Lastly, Gunther informs the members of the staffing polices explaining how staffing will be planned on a yearly basis.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Public School 33 Manhattan's Student Council

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Student Council of Public School 33 in Manhattan, NY, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King. The council pledged to practice Dr. King's principles on nonviolence and mentioned how impressed they were to see Mrs. King on television, following Dr. King's death.