Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"VENEZUELA"

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the expenses for the Spanish pocket book edition of "Why We Can't Wait" and encloses a royalty check.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

Letter from Sampson & Sampson to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Ms. Dora McDonald received this telegram pertaining to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The sender requests that Mrs. King speak at a political action event in South Carolina. The author of this telegram was running for state senate.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Letter from Shelley Winters Franciosa to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1959

Actress Shelley Winters sends Dr. King her personal copy of "The Diary of Anne Frank" after he and Mrs. King attend a screening for the film adaptation in New York. Winters would go on to receive an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 31:3.

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Telegram from Arrowsmith to MLK

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Arrowsmith issues a telegram inquiring about Dr. King's potential visit to the country of Australia.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Mapp and Welch Families

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King express their condolences to the Mapp and Welch Families, and the West Hunter Street Baptist Church.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Huntington writes to Dr. King concerning the separation of a mother and child in hospitals after birth. Huntington states, "If we get back to nature's ways in our hospitals instead of starting each new human life in America by rejecting it, as it were, I suspect the increase of juvenile delinquency would melt away."

Letter from Peter Sevetnyk to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Peter Servetynk, a former Roman Catholic Priest from Canada, invites Dr. King to speak at a massive gathering in Toronto. He further thanks Dr. King for his charitable works and wishes there were more people of his stature.

Letters from Pearce Godfrey to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Pearce Godfrey forwards to Dr. King several letters that he has written concerning his views on United States involvement in Vietnam, the usage of "under God" in the pledge of allegiance, and John F. Kennedy's statement before the United Nations that "life is unfair."

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Telegram from George Garabedian to MLK

Sunday, July 24, 1966

Mr. Garabedian, a tourist agent in Jerusalem and Jordan, requests that Dr. King allow him to make accommodations for his upcoming trip.

Examination for MLK Class

This document contains examination questions for Dr. King's class. Dr. King taught a class at Morehouse College briefly in the early 1960s.

Letter of Support from Sara Mitchell to MLK

Sunday, June 11, 1967

A member from the Board of Education of the City of Atlanta congratulates Dr. King on his article in the "Progressive" taken from "Where Do We Go from Here?" She also informs Dr. King that she is taking the article to the school board.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King records Soren Kierkegaard’s definition of the existential moment.