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"VENEZUELA"

Request for a Speaker Choice '68

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Lonnie Longmire, representative of Baylor Universtiy, request that Dr. King suggest speakers that support his presidential candidacy for the Choice '68 project.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963
New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962
Atlanta, GA

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from Joseph Duffy to MLK

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Executive Director of the American Booksellers Association, Joseph A. Duffy, expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for giving a speech at their Convention.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
GREECE, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, KENYA

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
New York, NY

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Nobel Lecture Itinerary

Oslo, Norway

This is an itinerary for the King family for the Nobel Peace Prize luncheon and lecture.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from MLK to Margo

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Margo for her inquiry about summer work with the SCLC and suggests she contact Hosea Williams about the SCOPE project for the following summer.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Letter from Paul Anderson to MLK

New York (NY)

Paul Anderson writes Dr. King requesting to know his association with Adam Clayton Powell.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

God

Dr. King writes about God's love according to Ezra 3:11.

Supralapsarianism

Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Harris Family

Albany, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King send condolences to Katie Harris upon the passing of Alphonso. The Kings remembered Alphonso as "a great and dedicated worker in the struggle for freedom and human dignity."

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY)

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
New York (NY)

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

We Have No Government

Tuesday, February 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is a transcription of a press conference held on behalf of the poor people in Mississippi. Leaders and participants discussed alternatives to government aid to help rectify poverty related concerns.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964
Georgia (GA)

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.