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"VIETNAM"

Letter from MLK to Jo Ellen Braveman

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Jo Ellen Braveman, an employee at the Julia Richman High School, and the Human Relations Club for presenting him with an award.

History

Dr. King references a quote from philosopher Hegel regarding the philosophy of history.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Metaphysics

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson’s “The Philosophy of Personalism” as a good defense.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

Letter from the Pacifist Crusade "John XXIII" to MLK

Sunday, April 11, 1965
ARGENTINA

Members of the Pacifist Crusade of Argentina extend support to Dr. King in his quest for peace. The group explains the background of the organization and express their goal of world peace through reconciliation.

Fundraising Letter from Dr. Benjamin Mays to Dr. MLK, Jr.

Friday, September 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College sends an urgent request to alumni to assist in furnishing rooms for a newly completed dormitory. As a distinguished alumni of the college, Dr. King is requested to lend financial support to this endeavor.

Press Release Regarding Child Development Group of Mississippi

Friday, September 30, 1966
Jackson, MS

The CDGM Board of Directors expresses their outrage over being replaced by the group "Action for Progress in Mississippi." They feel that Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed the group without their input and in violation of the OEO's stated policies.

Objects and the Nature of Thought

Dr. King notates the various explanations of "objects" and "the nature of thought."

Letter from Vilna Torres to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vilna Torres writes a letter of condolence to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Jesus

ISRAEL

Dr. King cites a quote from Claude J. Montefiore's book, "Some Elements of the Religious Teaching of Jesus."

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Maryland (MD)

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Peace and Freedom Party

Sunday, January 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, California (CA)

The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin E. Mays Regarding Meeting

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this letter to Benjamin Mays, the president of Morehouse College, Dora McDonald state that Dr. King will be in attendance at their meeting on December 19, 1962.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
SENEGAL, GAMBIA, PORTUGAL

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.

Letter from Ellen Bandler to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 11, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ellen Bandler writes Miss McDonald about a letter that was received on September 10, 1962 concerning the publication of Mr. Killens' book being postponed until January 1963.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Chicago, IL

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Outline Regarding Man

Dr. King's outline regarding a number of topics pertaining to Man and ones pilgrimage through life.

Letter from Samuel Newman to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Samuel Newman requests that Dr. King's recent address made in New York on Vietnam. Dr. Newman also provides a contribution for Dr. King's "noble activities".

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967
Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

Letter from MLK to Robert Epstein

Thursday, November 15, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Robert Epstein regarding the objective of SCLC. King states, "No man can comment adequately on his own motives... I would hope agape is the driving force in our movement." Dr. King encloses a pamphlet entitled "This is SCLC."

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.