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"VIETNAM"

Letter From Donald A. DiNuccio to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Sixteen-year-old Donald DiNuccio writes Dr. King expressing his opinion on the "racial problem" and extends his support.

Letter from Frank Thompson Jr. to MLK

Monday, February 17, 1964

New Jersey Democratic Congressman Frank Thompson thanks Dr. King for his message regarding the Congressman's part in the fight for civil rights. Thompson mentions that he considers Dr. King to be one of the "great leaders" of their generation.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

New Housing Developments - West

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Spencer, Herbert

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer's "First Principles" on the subject of evolution.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.

Letter from Elbert Ransom Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 18, 1966

In this letter from Mr. Ransom to Dr. King the former welcomes Dr. King to "our complexed [sic] city." The author also expresses nostalgia for previous shared experiences and his hopes for the future of the movement.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Friday, January 6, 1967

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Book of Job, elaborating on the goodness of God and it's correlation with human suffering.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

Letter from MLK to Senator Abraham Ribicoff

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Abraham Ribicoff's efforts in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Whitney M. Young to Friends

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Whitney Young, Executive Director of the National Urban League, urges African Americans to educate themselves on the opportunities that the U.S. Navy offers.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Statements of Wisdom"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing boxes in reference to a statement of Wisdom by Charles G. Finney.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 6, 1964

Joan Daves requests clarification regarding Dr. King's schedule.

Our God is Able

Sunday, January 4, 1953

Reverend Frederick M. Meek retells a story in the New Testament about a civilization and their journey to discover that God is able.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

Tuesday, October 13, 1964

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from J. Reynolds to MLK

J. Reynolds expresses his opinion on Dr. King's recent activism in Memphis and describes it as a "riot." Mr. Reynolds questions Dr. King's intentions and highlights the negative outcome of the demonstration.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from Robert Maxwell

Robert Maxwell, a member of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, seeks clarification for Dr. King's visit to England.

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.