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"VIETNAM"

Mission to Mississippi : Invitation to a Conference

This document lists Dr. King and other clergymen as they invite selected religious leaders to a conference entitled "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission is in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It will be a one day event to be held in Jackson, Mississippi on July 20, 1961.

Letter from Bertha Baker to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Bertha Baker requests Dr. King's assistance regarding discrimination issues involving employment, private industry, housing and education. Mrs. Baker details inequalities in numerical form and concludes with a request to join Dr. King's organization.

Ethics

Dr. King quotes Psalms 28:3, which he interprets as showing the importance of one's intentions and mental attitude.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, October 9, 1963

Major J. Jones wishes to confirm Dr. King's speaking engagement at the Jobs and Freedom Conference in Chattanooga, Tennessee on November 13, 1963.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Useful Work for the Rev. Martin Luther

This newspaper clipping contrasts Dr. King's view of the job discrimination to the report by Assistant Secretary of Commerce Andrew Brimmer. According to the article, Dr. King feels that little has been done to ameliorate job discrimination amongst blacks. Mr. Brimmer has an opposite view, which is reflected in his report.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

Letter from Joseph P. Robinson to MLK

Friday, July 28, 1967

Reverend Joseph P. Robinson invites Dr. King to contribute to Robinson's book of sermons titled, "Pulpit Evangelism."

Monism

Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.

Letter from Emerson College to MLK Regarding Speaking Invitation

Monday, November 20, 1967

Emerson College extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at their communication lecture series. The lecture coordinator, Vic Silvestri, assures Dr. King that he will be awarded both an honorarium and travel expenses if he accepts.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Lebbano and Mr. Mayle

Dr. King drafts a handwritten response letter. He informs the recipients of his pressing commitment to social justice.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Letter from Robert Maxwell

Robert Maxwell, a member of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, seeks clarification for Dr. King's visit to England.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Barth

Dr. King notes Karl Barth's views on Jesus.

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

MLK Speech at the Americana Hotel

Tuesday, October 23, 1962

Dr. King compares the Maritimer Union's struggle for improved working conditions to the continuous fight for civil rights in the African American community.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

The Boston Sunday Globe: The Road to Loyalty

Sunday, August 28, 1966

Justice Felix Frankfurter is quoted by the Boston Sunday Globe to discuss the lack of liberty in history due to repulsive individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union is accused of being communist as well as Jefferey Gordon, a member of the pro-Peking Progressive Labor Party. The article expounds on various organizations and quotes surrounding their political perspective.

Events

Dr. King quotes Lawrence's dissertation on the meaning of events in nature.

Progress

Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.