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"Virginia (VA)"

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Sidney Anger

Monday, March 25, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Sidney Anger for his contribution of $100 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King continues to share the current work of the organization and the importance of financial support in order to ensure sustainability.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Subsidized Housing Project Proposal

Atlanta, GA, Dallas, TX

In this proposal for an Atlanta based housing project for low income families, the terms and conditions are drawn out amongst all organizations involved. These consist of Ebenezer Baptist Charitable Foundation, the Federal Housing Insuring Office, the Housing Authority, the Federal National Mortgage Association, Mauldower and Paterson, Joe Robinson and James S. Robinson. Additionally, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Jr. are described in a brief biography as reference to the leadership involved in the undertaking.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964
New York, NY

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.

February 1968, Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, writes to announce the endorsment of Reverend S. M. Sam Davis at their candidate for bishop.

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, annouces Reverend S. M. Sam Davis as their candidate for bishop. As a member of the Davis Boosters' Club, she attempts to solicit support for Reverend Davis. The Boosters' Club will feature Mrs. Lucinda Brown Pobey and Mrs. Willie Mae bell in a special financial event.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Florida (FL), ISRAEL

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

ABC Letter re Issues and Answers

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Peggy Whedon, producer of ABC's "Issues and Answers" program, expresses disappointment that Dr. King may not appear on the show the coming weekend because of a strike.

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Madrid, Spain

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.

Letter from A.M. Davis to Mr. James Parham Regarding Emory Case

Monday, October 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

A. M. Davis, President of the NAACP's Atlanta Branch, wrote this letter as part of an Atlanta Medical Association complaint against Emory University.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

Tuesday, February 9, 1965
New York (NY)

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Florida (FL)

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.

Letter from Henry Duerksen to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Kansas (KS), Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Duerksen sends a brief letter showing his support and pride for Dr. King's work and dismissing negative statements toward Dr. King.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965
Georgia (GA), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK Requesting a Leave of Absence from the S.C.L.C.

Monday, June 13, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell requests a one-year leave of absence from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to work with Citizens Crusade Against Poverty. Blackwell will assist the S.C.L.C. sister organization with its emerging Southern Rural Development Project.

Invitation from Hermon Dilmore to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Representing the American Baptist Men, Director, Hermon C. Dilmore makes acquaintance with Dr. King via mutual friend, J.C. Herrin, Assistant General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention. Mr. Dilmore invites Dr. King to stop by the American Baptist Men's booth at the Convention in Pittsburgh. Furthermore, he invites attendance of at least one family from Dr. King's church to the 24th Annual National Conference at the American Baptist Assembly in Green Lake, Wisconsin.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

List of SCLC Program Areas

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This list briefly outlines the SCLC Program Areas including Voter Registration and Political Education, Citizenship Education, Operation Breadbasket, and Direct Action.

Telegram to MLK from Treasurer W. E. Shortridge

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Members of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights send Dr. King encouraging words during his sentence at Albany City Jail.

Chicago Freedom Movement on Open City Reform

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Freedom Movement requests that the city's mayor equally enforces the Chicago Fair Housing Ordinace.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK and Joan Daves

Tuesday, November 10, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, BELGIUM

Pierre Servais writes to Dr. King on behalf of the publishing company that will soon be translating "Strength To Love" in French. Servais would like to know, among other things, if Dr. King will be able to make a stop in Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe. Servais would like to hear from Dr. King as soon as possible concerning a meeting because he would like to launch the French version of "Strength To Love", while Dr. King is in Europe.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966
New York (NY)

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.