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"WESTERN SAHARA"

Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN)

Major J. Jones writes to Dr. King, offering to host the SCLC's Annual Spring Board Meeting in Chattanooga, where he is a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones mentions that having the SCLC in Chattanooga would help the city. However, Dr. King couldn't accept Mr. Jones' invitation due to prior arrangements to host the 1965 SCLC Spring Board Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Schleiermacher (The Immanence of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Telegram to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The sender of this telegram is requesting to know if Dr. King intends to travel to Sweden.

Initiative for Peace In Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire detail the origins of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its action plan. As they explain, a group of Norwegian citizens approached living Nobel Peace Prize winners to develop a project focusing on achieving peace in Vietnam. To reach that goal, the initiative plans to send representatives to each group involved with the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Tore Lundby

Monday, May 24, 1965
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King informs Mr. Lundby, Editor, he is unable to contribute an article to BLAESUVOLDEINS EFTERRETNINGSTIDENDE.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

Chicago, IL

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

Letter from Pauline Lee to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967
California (CA)

Pauline Lee withdraws her support from Dr. King due to his failure to withdraw support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from A.M. Davis to Mr. James Parham Regarding Emory Case

Monday, October 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

A. M. Davis, President of the NAACP's Atlanta Branch, wrote this letter as part of an Atlanta Medical Association complaint against Emory University.

People In Action: "Virginia's Black Belt"

Saturday, April 14, 1962
Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Prince Edward County, VA, Washington, D.C.

In this article from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King describes his expereince on his "People to People" tour through the United States, noting his experience in the "black belt" in Virginia.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Sin

Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.

Romanticism and Rationalism

Dr. King quotes Niebuhr's statement on romanticism and rationalism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), JAMAICA

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Michigan (MI), Delaware (DE)

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965
NORTH KOREA, San Francisco, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GERMANY

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.