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"WESTERN SAHARA"

First Assembly of the World Council of Churches

Monday, August 23, 1948
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This photo, taken in August of 1948, illustrates the first meeting of the World Council of Churches in Amsterdam.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Letter from Roosevelt Zanders to MLK

Sunday, June 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Roosevelt Zanders expresses his appreciation to Dr. King after receiving a kind letter and personal autographed copy of "Stride Toward Freedom." Zanders expresses his appreciation for the luncheon in Washington, D. C. and states his desire to visit the Reverend again.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
JAPAN

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

MLK on the Death of Paul Tillich

Dr. King comments on the life and deeds of Paul Tillich, a German-American theologian and a major influence on the philosophies of Dr. King.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Letter from MLK and Rev. Abernathy Regarding the Clergymen's Conference

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL

Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy write to inform their readers of the tentative dates of the Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket. King and Abernathy mention that the dates of the conference need to be moved due to their impending jail sentence.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Letter From DuPree Jordan to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

DuPree Jordan, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, hopes to meet with Dr. King and hear his suggestions and ideas to improve any of the OEO's programs.

SCLC North Carolina Field Report

North Carolina (NC)

Golden Frinks, a SCLC field secretary who represented the New Bern, North Carolina chapter, releases a field report. This report discusses the SCLC Action Program in North Carolina, and includes a monthly overview of the SCLC's contributions.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Richard Henry Tawney's "Religion and the Rise of Capitalism."

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King sends his condolences for the death of Archbishop Paul Hallinan.

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC)

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

North Carolina (NC), INDIA

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
New York, NY

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Letter from the British and Foreign Bible Society to MLK

Saturday, September 10, 1966
UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), New York, NY

The British and Foreign Bible Society invites Dr. King to their Bible Week at Aberystwyth during the summer of 1967. The society is commemorating the 400th anniversary of Welsh New Testament. Rev. T. J. Davies informs Dr. King of possible publication opportunities for his book that can take place during his stay in Aberystwyth.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. King to Mrs. A. B. Cooper & Family

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. and Mrs. King express their regret for being unable to attend the funeral; however, they offer condolences to Mrs. A. B. Cooper and family for the loss of their loved one.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Atlanta, GA

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Homer A. Jack

Thursday, September 2, 1965
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy submits a check on behalf of the SCLC to Homer Jack of the Unitarian Universalist Association to be donated to the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. The money will be used to purchase a new home for Jackson's parents and to finance the education for Jackson's sister. Jimmie Lee Jackson was murdered by a Alabama State Trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from a beating during a march melee in Marion, Alabama. Jackson's death initiated the push for a march from Selma to Montgomery.

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.