The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Letter from James Bevel on the Spring Mobilization Committee

James Bevel, national director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, offers insight into the purpose of the committee. The committee focuses on launching two mass demonstrations to stop the war, with the goal of "seeking to stimulate increased activity everywhere."

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Frank Emspak, of the National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam, invites Dr. King to a convention to speak about his antiwar and pacifism sentiments.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Letter from David H. Staley to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

David H. Staley agrees with the SCLC's stance on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Beryl Sacks to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Ms. Beryl Sacks inquires about the availability of Dr. King to speak for the Speakers Bureau Adult Education Council.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."


Dr. King quotes the Executive Committee of the World Council of Churches on war in an atomic age being a sin against God, as reported in The Christian Century.

Request for MLK's Autograph

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Thomas Smith, Director of Placement at Saint Peter's College, requests that Dr. King autograph a program for friends of Father McGlinchey.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

The World's March Toward Human Rights

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issue of Equal Justice Under the Law at a convocation of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American one of the great men of all time."

The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Letter from Joseph Duffy to MLK

Thursday, June 15, 1967

The Executive Director of the American Booksellers Association, Joseph A. Duffy, expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for giving a speech at their Convention.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Operation Breadbasket Cost Breakdown

Operation Breadbasket was a division of the SCLC founded in 1962 and operated by Reverend Fred C. Bennett. The project was dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States. This is an estimated cost breakdown for the operation. It includes expected wages, salaries, transportation, insurance, and office supplies for running the project for one year.