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Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Monday, September 16, 1963

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."


Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Letter from Winthrop Steele to MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Winthrop Steele writes Dr. King asserting that he was a supporter and fan of Dr. King and his civil rights doctrine until his recent remarks about the Vietnam War. Steele advises Dr. King to take a sabbatical, reexamine his views, and focus on civil rights.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

The National Council of Negro Women

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.

Pass The Ammunition

Ernie Sheffield voices his opinion on the "Department of War Violence and Brute Force" and the spending of a billion dollars a week on violence. He states that in their spending of valuable money not "even a dime" has been spent on a "Department of Peace, Goodwill and Coexistence."

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

Final Plans for the Washington Poor People's Campaign

This document outlines the dates, times, places and events that will take place in preparation for the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Auguste Sabatier's "Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion Based on Psychology and History."

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy expresses appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to give an oral history interview for the JFK Library.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

The Unlimited Christ

Dr. King outlines three ways in which God is limited.

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

Sunday, January 27, 1963

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

Friday, June 1, 1962

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

Thursday, June 18, 1964

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

Friday, November 22, 1963

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Walk for Freedom

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Resolution for the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives

This document is a resolution that explains the rules for current and incoming members of the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives.

Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.