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"WESTERN SAHARA"

Suggestions for S.C.L.C.

Dr. King drafts a list of suggestions for the SCLC and lists the contact information for several of the organizations members.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Frank Kuhlman about Support

In this letter Dr. King expresses his belated gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kuhlman for their letter of support. Dr. King also comments on nonviolence and the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Halevy H. Simmons to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1962

New York-based architect Halevy H. Simmons offers his professional services to rebuild Negro churches in the state of Georgia.These pillars of Negro culture were targeted throughout the state in a series of racially motivated hate crimes.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 5:4.

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

Thursday, September 15, 1966

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Letter from Andrew Young to Reverend B. J. Cameron

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Andrew Young, acting as Executive Assistant to Dr. King, responds to Rev. Cameron's letter regarding SCLC's involvement in Grenada, Mississippi. He assures Rev. Cameron that the SCLC has not forgotten about Grenada and discusses plans to see him in the future.

Letter from Jim E. Hansen to MLK Regarding Support for Presidency

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Jim Hansen, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68, a Time-Life sponsored national presidential primary at the College of Southern Utah, wrote to MLK in support of Dr. King as a presidential candidate. He requested materials for the April 1968 event which took place on the college's campus.

Black Power - Dr. Vincent Harding

Dr. Harding gives a full detailed presentation on Black Power before the Southeastern Regional Advisory Board of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

Correspondence: Letter to Mr.Foner from Dr.King (Feb. 26, 1968)

Sunday, February 25, 1968

Dr. King sends a contribution to Moe Foner to help in the efforts for peace in Vietnam.

Photograph of MLK

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Letter from William T. and Scottie Lee Ellis to MLK

Saturday, May 25, 1963

The Ellis family informs Dr. King about demonstrations in Alaska, while offering up words of gratitude for civil rights efforts in Birmingham.

Public Statement by the Albany Movement

Tuesday, January 23, 1962

The statement from the Albany Movement addresses issues of racial injustice and stresses the importance of equality for all.

Letter from MLK to J. Frank Patch

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dr. King declines to accept J. Frank Patch's invitation to attend the conference sponsored by the Baptist Union of Western Canada due to prior commitments in the United States.

Letter from Louise A. Andrews to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961

On behalf of the American Friends Service Committee, Louise Andrews invites Dr. King to attend and speak at one of their Regional offices in Pennsylvania or Wisconsin.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

Letter from Nancy Atkinson of Time Magazine to MLK

Wednesday, April 29, 1964

Nancy Atkinson sends Dr. King a duplicate of the Time Magazine cover honoring him as the Man of the Year for 1963. He is informed that the cover will be a part of a traveling exhibit of other Time covers.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Letter from David Ben-Gurion to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

Mr. Ben-Gurion, founder and first prime minister of Israel, congratulates Dr. King on his decision to lead a mass pilgrimage to Israel and Jordan. He also informs King that he is planning a trip to the US and looks forward to the opportunity of meeting in person. The pilgrimage, scheduled for November 1967, did not take place because of the Six Day Arab-Israeli War that June.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Letter from Ernest C. Copper to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Ernest Cooper, Executive Director of the Urban League of Cleveland, seeks a meeting with Dr. King to discuss how the two agencies can cooperate on the tentative Cleveland program announced by SCLC.