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"WESTERN SAHARA"

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Monday, February 25, 1963

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Manuscript

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter, Genevieve Young informs Joan Daves of the notes created for the manuscript of Dr. King's book and questions about the sources of some of Dr. King's facts.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

Letter from Representative Stanley R. Tupper to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Maine Congressman Stanley R. Tupper acknowledges his receipt of Dr. King's telegram concerning the Washington D. C. Home Rule Bill. He informs Dr. King that he will sign the discharge petition for the bill if it remains obstructed by a committee for much longer.

MLK Speech at the Americana Hotel

Tuesday, October 23, 1962

Dr. King compares the Maritimer Union's struggle for improved working conditions to the continuous fight for civil rights in the African American community.

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Letter from Mark Henderson to MLK

In this letter Mark Henderson comments on the incidents at the South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Friday, October 4, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 8, 1964

In this letter,Joan Daves informs Dr. King that an offer for a Norwegian edition of "Strength to Love" has been made. Joan also mentions that contracts have been made for Dr.King to sign.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Western Union Telegram from Albert Shanker to MLK

Mr. Shanker, President United Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO, thanks Dr. King for his support during a teachers' strike.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Telegram from MLK to the Pennsylvania State Welfare Rights Organization

Monday, March 25, 1968

Dr. King states his support for demonstrations by the Pennsylvania State Welfare Rights Organization.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

Letter from Peter Manniche to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Peter Manniche, Chairman of the Scandinavian Executive Committee invites Dr. King to the Scandinavian nations to make public, radio, and television speaking appearances. Mr. Manniche is hopeful the Dr. King's presence in Eastern Europe will garner support for the civil rights cause in America.

We Have No Government

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

This is a transcription of a press conference held on behalf of the poor people in Mississippi. Leaders and participants discussed alternatives to government aid to help rectify poverty related concerns.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Secretary of Morehouse College Board of Trustees, J. H. Wheeler, inquires if Dr. King will be in attendance for the annual meeting.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

SCLC Benefit Appeal

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King personally requests the support of forty organizations for SCLC's "Stars for Freedom" benefit. The appeal states that featured artists at the event include Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Sidney Portier, and Dr. King will also be speaking at the event.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Court Summons for MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

The Circuit Court of Dallas County issues Dr. King a summons to appear before the Grand Jury.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.