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"WESTERN SAHARA"

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Detroit, MI, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967
CANADA, Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SWEDEN

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967
VIETNAM, CHINA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from Sharyl Green to MLK

Saturday, November 9, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Sharyl Green, a junior at Roosevelt School in Michigan, expresses her admiration for Dr. King's work and inquires if Dr. King could send her his biography. Green also shares a piece of her literary work with Dr. King.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962
Iowa (IA), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO)

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Telegram from the Bailey Family to Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

The Bailey family welcomes Dr. King home.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Monday, January 8, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA)

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, December 20, 1966
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Telegram to Dr. James Nabrit from MLK

Monday, July 16, 1962
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Dr. King invites Dr. James M. Nabrit to share the privilege of being a special guest with him at the National Press Club.

Draft Proposal for Southern Regional Community Services Council

Tuesday, March 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

As a draft proposal for the non-profit Southern Regional Community Services Council, this document outlines the purpose and intended methodologies of the organization. The Council's mission is to train local leaders to help the unemployed and poor find jobs. Local leaders would include representation from churches, colleges, farm groups, professionals, and small businesses. Other goals are to increase living standards and cycle income back into businesses that focus on community savings and development.

Clement of Alexandria

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on Clement of Alexandria.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966
New York, NY

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Oslo, Norway, Montgomery, AL

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY)

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.

53rd Annual NAACP Convention

Tuesday, June 5, 1962
New York, NY, Texas (TX), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

Serving as an itinerary for the 53rd Annual NAACP Convention, this document outlines the schedule, location, and speakers of the seven-day event.