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Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

A Prayer to the MLK Family from Robert N. Kellett

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
Florida (FL)

Robert N. Kellett, President of the Coral Gables Employees Association, offers a prayer to the King family honoring the life and work of Dr. King.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968
New York, NY

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

A Letter to Advisory Council Member from Robert L. Green

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI)

In this correspondence, Robert L. Green writes an Advisory Council member concerning the Chicago adult education project. Mr. Green notifies the member that due to a reduced monetary grant from the federal government, the program will officially close.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968
Cambridge, MA

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Draft of a Letter from MLK to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a letter written by Dr. King to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield. Dr. King indicates that he recieved a letter from Barbara Payne which suggested that Dr. Whitfield had expressed a desire to support the Freedom Movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966
Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Ohio (OH), Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

SCLC Memo- The Ministers Leadership Training Program

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This memo reminds the Steering Committee and Executive Staff, of the SCLC, that "funds for the Ministers Leadership Training Program are not being used to finance currect SCLC direct-action programs."

Letter from Erskine Caldwell to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
California (CA)

Noted author Erskine Caldwell congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Caldwell's works, including the highly acclaimed book Tobacco Road, addressed poverty, racism and social problems in his native South.

Letter from MLK to David Brandyberry

Friday, August 9, 1963
Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Brandyberry for his recent letter and explains why the current time is "a wonderful and challenging age." He also expresses his hope that the work done in Birmingham, Alabama will bring about better race relations.

Letter from Kendall Bryant to MLK

Sunday, October 27, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL

A fourth grader from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia writes Dr. King to inform him of a donation drive conducted by "Mrs. Magaziner's 4th grade class" for the rehabilitation of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The student requests a response letter from Dr. King to take back to the class.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Friday, July 7, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Sydney Vincent, the Executive Director of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, would like to gather the major Jewish organizational leaders to discuss Dr. King's work in Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from MLK to James Farmer

Thursday, April 30, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends James Farmer a complimentary copy of a journal on the works of the SCLC.

Telegram from Kenneth O'Donnell of the White House to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Kenneth O'Donnell sends this telegram to Dr. King encouraging the Reverend to attend a meeting with the President of the United States and several other Civil Rights leaders.

Hate Mail Regarding Race Relations to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY)

The author write Dr. King to express his disdain for the Negro race. Stating that Negros are ?savages?, the author proclaims that the White race will forever remain in power.

Totalitarianism

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

Why We Cant Wait Sticker

This document is a New American Library window sticker advertising Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

Schedule for Oslo Trip

Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA, London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, KENYA, FRANCE

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Spurrier, William A.

Dr. King cites William Spurrier's "Guide to the Christian Faith."

Telegram from MLK to Robert M. Drevs

Chicago, IL

Dr. King applauds Robert M. Drevs and the Catholic Interracial Council for selecting Bill Berry to receive the John F. Kennedy award.

Letter from Geraldine Jones to MLK

Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, California

In this letter, Geraldine Jones tells Dr. King about the heightened racial tension in Chicago, and her fear that Chicago will soon have a riot like Los Angeles.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Letter from MLK to Robert B. Shaw

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Dr. King informs Mr. Robert B. Shaw that his commitment to the Civil Rights Movement and hectic schedule hindered him from attending the rally.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Book Sales

Friday, September 4, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves reports the sale figures for royalties and advances of the manuscript "Why We Can't Wait".