Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Washington (WA)"

Letter from Senator Birch Bayh to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Indiana Senator Birch Bayh thanks Dr. King for his note supporting Bayh's vote in favor of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Bayh also thanks Dr. King for his concern regarding Bayh and his wife's recent accident. He includes a handwritten postscript in which he mentions the hope of meeting Dr. King in person.

Song of Songs

Dr. King writes a brief summary of the book Song of Songs.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Temporary Injunction Filed Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

This is a legal document for a temporary injunction filed by the city of Birmingham against Wyatt Tee Walker.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Friday, February 24, 1961

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Friday, May 17, 1957

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to MLK

Sunday, April 18, 1976

Ernest Shaefer writes Dr. King relaying detailed information regarding Dr. King's travel to Philadelphia International Airport and his speech at Unionville High School in Pennsylvania.

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

Letter from MLK to Attorney Bell

Dr. King writes Attorney Bell thanking him for offering his services "to the Freedom Movement and the work of the SCLC."

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence Kirkpatrick

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dora McDonald sends a biographical sketch and photograph as requested to Laurence Kirkpatrick.

Personality

Dr. King cites a quote from J. M. E. McTaggart's understanding of personality from "Studies in Hegelian Cosmology."

Marx

Dr. King quotes an unknown source on Marx.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Letter from Prince Johannes of Bohemia to MLK

Sunday, December 17, 1967

Prince Johannes, claimant to the throne of Bohemia, requests Dr. King's participation in the Presidium of the World Government.

Oxford Movement

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Letter from MLK to Claes Collenberg

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere appreciation to Claes Collenberg of Sweden for his help in raising money to assist with the civil rights movement in America. He conveys to Mr. Collenberg that he will be notified of updates involving the Chicago Campaign on housing.