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Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Letter from Dorothy I. Height to MLK

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dorothy Height invites Dr. King to the 32nd National Convention of the National Council of Negro Women. Height serves as the national president of the NCNW.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

Periods of Greek Literature

Dr. King provides brief notes on three periods of Greek literature.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "Dogmatics in Outline" on Jesus and his relationship to God.

Definition of Christianity

Dr. King records a definition of Christianity. He defines Christianity as the belief in the "potential good in human nature."

An Evaluation of the Racial Problems of Chicago

The writer of this document examines the intended efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC in addressing the issues of poor urban conditions, unemployment, unequal education and lack of Negro political involvement in the City of Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Albert A. Goldman

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King informs Rabbi Albert A. Goldman that he will not be able to be a speaker at the Community Thanksgiving Services at The Isaac M. Wise Temple this year.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

MLK Writes Rev. Frank N. Williams Thanking Him for Support

Thursday, October 11, 1962

Dr. King writes Rev. Williams and expresses his appreciation for his witness in Albany, Ga. He also apologizes for the time delay of the letter explaining that there was an accumulation of mail in his office. He goes on to say that the work that Rev. Williams has done was very important and will continue to be needed in the movement.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses royalties for Dr. King's "Why We Can?t Wait," and "Strength to Love."