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"Washington (WA)"

Infralapsarianism

Dr. King defines infralapsarianism.

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Love in Action

Dr. King expounds on the love of God by referencing a verse from the Bible in the Book of Luke. The verse states, "Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do." Dr. King notes the truth of this verse is also revealed in race relation of today.

Program - Dexter Avenue Baptist Church 18th Anniversary Banquet 1957

Friday, December 13, 1957

The printed program, shown here, was for an anniversary banquet, in celebration of the 80th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King became the pastor at Dexter Avenue from 1954-1960. Mr. T.M. Alexander, of Atlanta, Georgia, is listed as the keynote speaker. Dr. King delivered the invocation and closing remarks for the anniversary banquet, held on December 13, 1957.

Letter from Saturday Review Editor Norman Cousins to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Saturday Review editor Norman Cousins writes Dr. King inquiring about a possible meeting with the magazine's editors.

Letter from Faye Drake to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965

Fay Drake of the Youth Department of the St. John Evangelist Baptist Church invites Dr. King to the church's Negro History Week celebration.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this letter Ms. Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for sending her the commission check from the "Saturday Review" SELMA piece. Daves goes on to say that Dr. King's article on the Watts riots was not published in several publications due to "scheduling problems", but will run in the "Saturday Review".

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?

This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten express their appreciation for Dr. King's address at Riverside Church and extend their complete support.

Letter from Minister C. Vernon Lake to MLK About a Vietnam Strategy

Monday, January 15, 1968

Minister C. Vernon Lake writes Dr. King with an enclosure containing a new strategy for vietnam. His plan is built on the shoulders of the World War II "Marshall Plan."

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

Friday, February 26, 1965

Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

Letter from Tori Bjerkmann to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Tori Bjerkmann, the editor of PAX magazine, encourages Dr. King to visit Scandinavia for the benefit of the Peace Movement in Norway.

Philadelphia Chapter of CORE Flyer

This flyer encourages participation in the reformation of the Philadelphia School System.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

Letter from Bob Bodie to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Bob Bodie, Choice '68 Chairman at John Brown University, asks Dr. King to send materials about himself for the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. Bodie requests posters, buttons and literature to acquaint the students with Dr. King.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Letter from Stanley Lavison to MLK Regarding Speeches

Thursday, March 17, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Stanley D. Levison references text books with Dr. King's speeches and The Chicago Rally.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Nietzsche

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.