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"Washington (WA)"

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Frederick Hewitt of Grace United Church writes Dr. King inviting him to visit the Thousand Islands for a combination of preaching with summer vacation.

Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's definition of the philosophy of religion. Brightman argues that the rational interpretation and comparison of religion is the basis for the philosophy of religion.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

JAMAICA

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

Sunday, April 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

The Blame in Birmingham

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Alabama (AL), FRANCE

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Letter from Eugenia C. Gambaccini to Russian Delegate

Eugenia Gambaccini impresses his hope that Russia "will realize the justice and love that God as for man, especially for those who have a good will."

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter to MLK from Ms. Eleanor Fischer

Monday, November 13, 1961
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Ms. Fischer writes to confirm a conference meeting, for an interview with Dr. King. She requests his presence at an informal dinner to discuss details about the program, for which his interview will be taped. Finally, she concludes by extending formalities to Dr. King's family and conveys her interests in interviewing them as well.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Dr. Abernathy Selected for World Peace Mission

Friday, December 29, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, INDIA, New Delhi, India, New York (NY), New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland, ITALY, TURKEY, ISRAEL, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Hawaii (HI), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces that Ralph D. Abernathy and his wife will embark on a world-wide mission for peace. Abernathy will serve as a delegate to the International Inter-religious Symposium on Peace.

"Focus Months" of the New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends

Thursday, February 1, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ)

In this document, this New York Yearly Meeting Office unveiled a plan of action for the months of March and April of 1968. The causes they focused on were the Black Power Movement and Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign initiative.

Soap, Brush Help

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from The American Foundation On Nonviolence to David Hunter

Thursday, January 18, 1968
New York, NY

The American Foundation On Nonviolence makes an inquiry to the distribution of grant funds from David Hunter.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
FRANCE, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

Letter from Pastor H. Edward Whitaker to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA

Whitaker, a former classmate at Crozer Theological Seminary, request's Dr. King's advice concerning a new ministry position at a Southern State College.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963
Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968
Chattanooga, TN, Memphis, TN, Connecticut (CT), California (CA), Nashville, TN

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.