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Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

Telegram from Oslo, Norway to Dora McDonald

Thursday, November 5, 1964

Dr. King receives this telegram as an advance welcome to Oslo, Norway and to confirm lodging reservations for him and his associates.

Letter from James W. Sheaffer to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

James Sheaffer, of Lycoming College's Department of Music, invites Dr. King to return to the college for another visit. Sheaffer also offers to arrange fundraising opportunities for the SCLC.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt T. Walker to Samual Weston

Monday, April 30, 1962

Wyatt T. Walker and Dr. King sent this telegram to Samual Weston informing him that they were requesting an investigation of his complaint.

Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 9, 1965

This program for the Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association gives a detailed history of the organization's events from 1955 to 1965. "Highlights At A Glance" include: accounts of violence and community bombings, school integration, freedom rides, The Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the establishment of the SCLC. Photographs of leadership, churches, voter registration, and marches appear throughout. This document also shows Dr. King's handwritten notes, copies of related news articles, and the individual programs for each day of the Institute.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Memorandum from MLK to SCLC

Saturday, February 8, 1958

In this memorandum to the representatives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King encloses two resolutions that the Executive Board approved. The resolutions state that a letter should be sent to Senator Thomas C. Hennings and Attorney General William P. Rogers. Dr. King suggests that the resolutions be adopted at all of the SCLC's mass meetings, scheduled for February 12th.

Dr. King Outlines "If"

Dr. King expounds on the subject "if." He proclaims the word to be primary in the English language.

Letter from Violet Panzram to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Panzram praises Dr. King for his "strong statements" against the Vietnam War and includes a contribution for his "peace efforts."

Statement of Royalty Account

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

This financial statement reflects SCLC's affiliation with Motown Record Corporation.

Letter from Ronald Bauer to MLK

Wednesday, January 20, 1965

Ronald Bauer congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. As President of the Inter American University, Bauer informs Dr. King of the institution's initiatives in the quest for peace. Two international conferences, sponsored by Inter American University, engages university students from all over the world. Bauer is embarking on a plan to establish his own international university and invites Dr. King to be part of a special International Advisory Council featuring notable world leaders.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

Letter from Rabbi Dudley Weinberg to MLK

Monday, September 14, 1964

Rabbi Dudley Weinberg writes Dr. King requesting him to give a sermon in Wisconsin because he believes that his presence there would provide "enormous impetus for the work which many of [us] are attempting to get done on behalf of our Negro fellow citizens."

Letter from Swedish Members of Parliament to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966

Two members of Parliament in Stockholm, Sweden hope to establish a fund among Christian Social Democrats and other Swedish organizations to support the SCLC. They request Dr. King's presence at a meeting in Gothenburg.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mr. Ostergaard, a representative of the Danish section of Amnesty International, invites Dr. King to speak publically at a Copenhagen Cathedral. He also invites Dr. King to participate in a local tour to bear witness schools and various social institutions. The document concludes with an additional letter addressed to Dr. King's assistant Miss D. McDonald.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."