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"Washington, D.C"

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

The World of Books

Saturday, June 17, 1967

This is a broad review of Dr. King's publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The article also notes that this was the first book Dr. King has released since his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author suggests that Dr. King focus on six specific things to accomplish in 1968.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Telegram to MLK Regarding a Social Eruption in Chicago

Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Dr. King a typed version of his statement on the violence occurring in a predominately Puerto Rican neighborhood in Chicago. Through the incident, Dr. King notes the callousness of law enforcement in the area.

Proposal to Save War-Burned and War-Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility sponsors an initiative to transport children from deplorable hospitals in Vietnam to the U.S. Plans also include enlisting help from governmental agencies, as well as collecting funds and support from the American people.

Letter from Calvin Kimbro to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962

Calvin Kimbro expresses his interest in famous African Americans and asks for a summary of Dr. King's life. Kimbro also wishes Dr. King luck and success in the near future.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

Letter from Malcolm R. La Place II to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1963

Malcolm La Place of WMAL TV News writes Dr. King regarding his address to the Capital Press Club. He hopes to arrange a videotape session as well.

Washington State University Students Invite MLK to Speak

Tuesday, December 22, 1964

Timothy D. Bradbury writes Dr. King on behalf of the students of Washington State University inviting him to speak about civil rights on their campus.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from James E. Orange to MLK

Rev. Andrew Young advises Rev. James Orange to contact Dr. King about a salary increase. As a member of the SCLC, Rev. Orange is assigned a project in Philadelphia and desires to avoid financial issues.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Fern McQuesten at the United Nations Assn of Hawaii

Monday, April 8, 1968

Ms. McQuesten extends condolences to Mrs. King and recalls fond memories of a meeting with Dr. King. She writes, "I met Mr. King many years ago...he will always be beckoning us on to greater achievements for mankind."

Telegram from Mrs. Dorothy Johnson to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Mrs. Dorothy Johnson writes Dr. King to express her support of his endeavors while he is in jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Charles Daly to Dr. King

Sunday, April 10, 1966

Charles Daly is attaching an article from the 1966 issue of the University of Chicago Magazine that he thought would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Friday, October 17, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

First Assembly of the World Council of Churches

Monday, August 23, 1948

This photo, taken in August of 1948, illustrates the first meeting of the World Council of Churches in Amsterdam.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

United States National Student Association Scope Questionnaire

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

The United States National Student Association prepares to publish the second edition of SCOPE, a directory of community service projects in which students can become involved during the summer months. A questionnaire is enclosed for organizations interested in listing their program.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."

L. Seyler's Report on Emil Brunner

L. Seyler from Christian Social Philosophy at Crozer Theological Seminary writes this paper on Emil Brunner, Swiss Protestant theologian. Written around February 20 - May 4, 1951, the paper contains subject matter regarding the crisis of contemporary culture.

Letter from Tori Bjerkmann to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Tori Bjerkmann, the editor of PAX magazine, encourages Dr. King to visit Scandinavia for the benefit of the Peace Movement in Norway.