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"Washington, D.C"

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

Tuesday, April 30, 1957
United States. Congress, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, PAKISTAN, TURKEY

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Letter from Irene S. Heath to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964
URUGUAY, CONGO / ZAIRE

Professor Irene Heath writes from Uruguay to suggest white missionary activity in Africa end, and that Dr. King and other black Christian leaders return to Africa to do missionary work there.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962
Ohio (OH), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from Saturday Review Editor Norman Cousins to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Saturday Review editor Norman Cousins writes Dr. King inquiring about a possible meeting with the magazine's editors.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Letter from Pastor Sutton-Branch to SCLC

Monday, April 8, 1968
Chicago, IL

In this letter Pastor Sutton-Branch, of the Commonwealth Community Church in Chicago, sends condolences and donations to the SCLC, while urging the recipient to extend sympathy to Mrs. King, for the loss of her husband.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Nebraska (NE), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964
South Carolina (SC)

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Sunday, September 13, 1964
Berlin, Germany, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Donation Slip with Criticism of MLK

Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A former contributer to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference criticized Dr. King on top of this donation slip.

Letter from Mark Staib to MLK

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mark Staib, a debater at John Carroll University, requests that Dr. King sends information on the debate topic: "Resolved: that the federal government should guarantee a minimum annual cash income for every citizen."

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

Letter of Gratitude from MLK to Mrs. Erber

This letter of gratitude was written to Mrs. Erber from Dr. King. In this letter Dr. King thanks Mrs. Erber for forwarding the newspaper clippings about her daughter Elena. Little Elena is a supporter against the injustices of racism. Dr. King thanks her for raising such an admirable daughter.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York (NY)

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Letter from Professor St. Clair Drake to MLK Regarding the Economic State of Negro People

California (CA)

In this letter, Standford University Professor of Sociology, St. Clair Drake, discusses his interest in launching a co-operative movement to aid the Negro people. Professor St. Clair Drake also mentions an enclosed newspaper.

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Royalty Statement for Strength To Love

New York (NY), New York, NY

This financial document from Joan Daves, an agent of Harper & Row in New York City, references an itemized Royalty statement for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Wisconsin (WI)

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Progress in Race Relations

In this outline for a speech, Dr. King emphasizes the need for continued work in the area of race relations. He argues that it is necessary to abolish segregation for democracy to live.

Letter from Katherine Camp to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Katherine L. Camp, Chairman for the Fiftieth Anniverdary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dora McDonald regarding plans for Dr. King's address at the banquet. Mrs. Coretta Scott King is listed as one of the sponsors for the event.

Birthday Card to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Margaret, which includes a verse from the book of Matthew.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

Letter from John H. Britton, Jr. to MLK about a Photograph

Monday, December 21, 1964
Chicago, IL

In this letter John H. Britton, Jr., managing editor of JET, encloses a copy of a photograph of Dr. King reading a novel, "The Prize," in a hospital bed. The photograph was sent to Dr. King after the author of the novel, Irving Wallace, also requested a copy.