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Letter from Eleanor Lawrence to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Eleanor Lawrence thanks Dr. King for his bold opposition to the Vietnam War. She understands that Dr. King's views transcend all across the globe and believes that Dr. King would make a perfect peace candidate for President in the 1968 elections.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding Quotes

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald to show Dr. King quotes attached to the document. Joan Daves also asks that comments and reviews be passed to her respectively.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, St. Augustine, FL, Cleveland, OH, Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Illinois (IL), CONGO / ZAIRE, CANADA

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, GERMANY, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

Letter from Joseph Duffy to MLK

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Executive Director of the American Booksellers Association, Joseph A. Duffy, expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for giving a speech at their Convention.

Outline Regarding Man

Dr. King's outline regarding a number of topics pertaining to Man and ones pilgrimage through life.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Detroit, MI

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Eisenhower (His Nationalism)

Dr. King writes a few notes on President Eisenhower's speech made at Lafayette College in 1946. President Eisenhower states that because the United States is the greatest force in the world, it should extend its influence to protect itself.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

New York (NY), New York, NY

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Monday, January 9, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, CHINA, Detroit, MI

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

Mississippi (MS), California (CA), New York, NY, JAMAICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, CANADA, Virginia (VA), New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN)

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

SCLC Annual Meeting Program

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This program outlines an annual meeting for the SCLC. The guest list includes Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson, Septima Clark and Joseph E. Lowery.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963
Missouri (MO)

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

CORE Treasure's Report for 1961 Fiscal Year

New York, NY

The Treasurer's Report from CORE includes the balance sheet for the fiscal year of 1961. The financial report covers an array of assets, liabilities, contributions, expenditures, and more.

Letter from Mrs. Everett L. Brantley to the SCLC

Friday, June 11, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Mrs. Brantley asks that the SCLC forward an enclosed check for Mrs. Reeb, funded by money raised at a citizens meeting in New Jersey.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Diaz

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Antiwar Slogans

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Letter from Jill Chisholm to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Johannesburg, South Africa

Ms. Chisholm, from South Africa, informs Dr. King of her temporary stay in the United States to research the non-violent movement and work of SCLC. She request to meet with Dr. King to discuss his work in Atlanta, GA and Chicago, IL.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Letter from Hermine I. Popper to MLK

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
New York (NY), JAMAICA

Hermine Popper writes Dr. King regarding his manuscript on "Black Power" for his upcoming book.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Arkansas (AR), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Brooklyn, NY

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967
SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."