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"West Virginia (WV)"

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "The Bible"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from the West Chester NAACP to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964

The West Chester Branch of the NAACP congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Letter from Berta Reller to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Berta Reller writes a letter to Dr. King regarding an article she has enclosed. The letter discusses recent riots and that extremists from the left and right wings are motivating them. Reller believes that there should be more focus on education.

Letter from Richmond Rudden to MLK

Wednesday, October 20, 1965

Richmond Rudden, Chairman of the Lectures-Concerts Committee to Lafayette College, invites Dr. King to speak at the college during the 1966-1967 academic year.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

What Is Man?

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

Letter from Neal to Dr. James Cone

Tuesday, May 17, 1983

Neal informs Dr. James Cone of a correspondence he found between Dwight Loder and Dr. King.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, March 30, 1964

Frazer Earle from the Canadian Council of Christian and Jews Inc. invites Dr. King to their Annual Banquet.

Doctrines

Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

March for Poor People

This document outlines the problem of poverty in America and suggests active participation as the only answer to the issue of poverty. The author argues that the March of Poor People to Washington is an opportunity to become involved in the effort to counteract poverty in America.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

Correspondence: Telgegram from W.A. Flowers to Dr.King

Friday, September 9, 1966

This telegram from W.A. Flowers is offering words of support and encouragement to Dr. King and the movement. Flower discourages the behavior leaders, such as Stokley Carmichael and hopes Dr. King stands firm to his conviction to better all man kind.

Letter From Walter J. Benedict to MLK

Sunday, October 29, 1967

Mr. Walter Benedict writes to Dr. King expressing his sympathy for King's incarceration in Birmingham. Benedict plans to show support by fasting and praying during the several days King is in jail.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Secular

Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Letter from MLK to Margo

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Margo for her inquiry about summer work with the SCLC and suggests she contact Hosea Williams about the SCOPE project for the following summer.

Telegram from Clarance L Carroll to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Mr. Carroll sends a congratulatory telegram to Dr. King. He also requests future correspondence.

Freudianism

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr on the subject of Freudianism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."