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Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Atlanta, GA, SWITZERLAND, Georgia (GA), Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Letter from George T. Raymond to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963
Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

George Raymond, Rebecca Taylor and Rosa Ballard follow up with Dr. King about his availability to speak to the NAACP in Chester, Pennsylvania.

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

Thursday, February 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, Texas (TX)

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964
Chicago, IL

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Optimism

Dr. King quotes F. S. Marvin's "The Living Past."

Outline for "Levels of Love"

In this handwritten outline, Dr. King highlights the subject of love. The document titled, “Levels of Love," focused on four categories: utilitarian love, romantic love, humanitarian love and Christian love.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, Richmond, VA, Ohio (OH), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Alabama (AL), BRAZIL

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Cover of the Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter

Monday, March 1, 1965
Iowa (IA)

The cover of Iowa's Catholic Interracial Council announces that Dr. King will be the recipient of the 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. The awards banquet is held in Davenport, Iowa.

Financial Statement for SCLC - OEO

Monday, May 15, 1967
Alabama (AL)

The Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the SCLC sends this budget outline to the Office of Economic Opportunity in request of financial changes.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
FRANCE, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

Letter from Edward McGaughy to MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New York (NY)

Edward McGaughy writes to Dr. King suggesting a "Christmas for Human Rights." The writer highlights a strategy to help make it possible for families in need to receive aid.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Friday, February 24, 1961
CANADA

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

We Shall Overcome Sketch

Charlie Cheese Carson's created this sketch which illustrates many notable civil rights leaders as chess pieces.

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Helping Across the South

Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from Ken Pardue to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Ken Pardue, the Election Commission Chairman of the Student Association at West Texas University, invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at Choice '68, a program conducted by Time magazine.

Authoritarianism

Dr. King quotes William Pepperell Montague's "Ways of Knowing."

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.