The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Wisconsin (WI)"

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil D. Jones

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Wayne Williams, Director of Field Activities at Fair Employment Practices Commission in Illinois, informs Virgil Jones that they have investigated his charge with the Commission and now want to review the information over with him.

Letter from Postal Worker to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

An anonymous postal worker requests that Dr. King write a letter to the regional director of the Atlanta Post Office concerning discriminatory employment practices.


Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1968

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Svend Eril Stybe

Friday, February 7, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark at the request of the Student Association. He graciously turns down the invitation stating that he has made the "firm decision" to spend more time in the American South in order to focus on civil rights work.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Oregon (OR)

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

Atlanta, GA

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Edwin T. Dahlberg to Charles H. Day Regarding MLK

Tuesday, November 30, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Iowa (IA), Des Moines, IA, Chester, PA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter Mr. Dahlberg encourages Mr. Day to send Dr. King a personal invitation to appear in Des Moines, Iowa. The author also discusses the Washington March for Peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Catholic Interracial Council's JFK Awards Dinner Honoring MLK Brochure

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Chicago, IL

This brochure outlines the Catholic Interracial Council's (CIC) John F. Kennedy Awards Dinner honoring Dr. King, to be held on October 29, 1968. In addition to describing the mission of the dinner, the brochure adds a description of the CIC and a biography of Dr. King. Also included is an article and photo from Dr. King's visit with Pope Paul VI.

Antioch College Commencement Program

Saturday, June 19, 1965
Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

This is a program for Antioch College's 1965 commencement, at which Dr. King addressed the graduating class.

Letter from Klaus Schwarze to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
GERMANY, Missouri (MO)

Mr. Schwarze requests that an autograph be sent to him in Germany for his collection from Dr. King.

Letter from Prime Minister Hugh Shearer to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
JAMAICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, newly appointed Jamaican Prime Minister Hugh Shearer thanks Dr. King for his "kind congratulations." Shearer goes on to ask for prayers of success on behalf of Jamaica and its people.

Letter from Gloria Cantor to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

Gloria Cantor, of Belafonte Enterprises, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting copies of Dr. King's speech at the Spring Mobilization.

What is The OIC Institute?

Philadelphia, PA

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Letter from Elaine Haley to Senator George Murphy

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM, California (CA)

Elaine Haley sends a letter to Senator George Murphy discussing Dr. King's views on riots in relation to ending the Vietnam War.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1957
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.