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Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY)

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Missouri (MO), Detroit, MI

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Florida (FL)

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

The Tabernacle Baptist Church

Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Tabernacle Baptist Church publishes this program for their Young Adult Sunday on March 20, 1960. Dr. King is listed to deliver the sermon at morning worship service.

Meet the Press

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., NIGERIA, California (CA)

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA)

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Mars Lecture Series

Tuesday, April 15, 1958
Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Holiday Card to Mrs. King

This holiday card was sent to Mrs. King from the Miller Family.

Letter from Percival Ennis to MLK


Percival Ennis, president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association in British Honduras, asks Dr. King if he is able to visit British Honduras and speak to his organization.

Telegram from MLK to the Pennsylvania State Welfare Rights Organization

Monday, March 25, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King states his support for demonstrations by the Pennsylvania State Welfare Rights Organization.

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Statement by MLK

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Birthday Card from Birmingham Mirror Newsapaper

Birmingham, AL

Ella Martin of the Birmingham Mirror newspaper sends Dr. King a birthday card, wishing him many happy returns of January 15th.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

Wednesday, September 14, 1966
Texas (TX), Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), Detroit, MI, Dallas, TX

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

Saturday, August 4, 1962

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Wyoming (WY), Atlanta, GA

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

Letter from MLK Regarding Atlanta University Center

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to a woman concerning what he calls "the best Negro colleges in the South." He discusses the Atlanta University Center, which consists of Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark University and Morris Brown College.

Broadside Regarding Julia Brown's Speech on MLK's Communist Connections

Texas (TX), Arkansas (AR)

This broadside advertises a speech to be given by former FBI agent Julia Brown. Brown was to speak on the alleged communist connections of Dr. King.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Illinois (IL)

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart


"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.