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Note Regarding Boycotting Olympic Game

This is a brief handwritten note of appreciation for encouraging the boycott of the Olympic Games.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Dr. Carlyle Marney

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Ralph David Abernathy writes to Reverend Carlyle to confirm his attendance to a conference held on May 6, 1965.

Memo from Edwin Berry and Melville Hosch to Freedom Government Conference Members

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare details the purpose of the Freedom-Government Conference and outlines the objectives for the scheduled meetings in the spring.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Remarks by the Right Rev. Richard S. Emrich

Friday, June 28, 1957
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

This address accompanies the awarding of the Springarn Medal to Dr. King. The Medal is presented annually by the NAACP for Outstanding Achievement by a Negro Citizen.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 9:17, a passage from the Bible concerning sin.

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

Letter from Fred Roesti to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Fred Roesti writes Dr. King to arrange a meeting between him and five pre-theological students, to get his perspective on "the contemporary social situation and the 'relevance' of the church."

Letter from MLK to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964
New York, NY

Dora McDonald writes Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to inquire about photos of Dr. King to be used for publication. The photos would be compiled for Dr. King's personal collection.

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967
New York (NY), London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to SCLC

Monday, September 24, 1962
Washington, D.C.

On the occasion of SCLC’s Annual Convention, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy states that the country has made great strides toward the realization of SCLC’s goal of assuring the rights of citizenship to all. The Department of Justice has acted and will continue to act to protect the right to vote.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967
Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Letter from Harper and Row, Inc to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter, Laura Paull, from the Religious Books Department of Harper and Row, Publishers Inc., requests Dr. King's opinion on the publication "In the End God" by John A. T. Robinson.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Letter from Frances Pauley to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Pauley, Executive Director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations, thanks Dr. King for his contribution to her organization.

Letter from Perceel Lanfair to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Perceel Lanfair informs Dr. King that she and her husband are looking for a larger apartment.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

MLK's Remarks to Swedish Audience

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA, SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King delivers a speech in Stockholm, Sweden applauding the nation's commitment and support of racial justice in America. King further articulates his belief that despite several social ills people will "be able to sing together in the not too distant future."

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961
CANADA

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

The New Frontiersmen

New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Vermont (VT), Colorado (CO), CHINA, CUBA, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Shreveport, LA, Iowa (IA)

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.