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I Have Decided to Start With Myself

Monday, August 14, 1967

This dictation of the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet includes speeches given by Dr. King, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, and Andrew Young. The keynote address given by Mr. Sidney Poitier concluded the evening, along with a presentation of an award.

Justification

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl as he discusses the concept of justification and its relationship to sin, guilt and salvation.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Epicureanism

Dr. King documents a passage from William De Witt Hyde's "Five Great Philosophers of Life" on Epicureanism. The passage outlines Epicurus' view on pleasure and the impersonal nature of the world.

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Letter from Calvary Presbyterian Church to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Enclosed in this letter from Dr. John Bruere, of Calvary Baptist Church, is a magazine entitled "Faith at Work - The Magazine of Christian Experience." The featured article, "The Church That Stayed," highlights a church that has endured the deterioration, violence, and looting of the neighborhood surrounding it. The author goes on to discuss the increase in membership and their attempt to represent Christ in every situation.

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

Monday, April 20, 1964

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Letter from Harry C. Meserve to Dr. King

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Mr. Meserve of the Michigan Human Relation Council thanks Dr. King for his address to the organization. Additionally he apologizes for the disturbance of the "Nazis" during his visit.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Our God is Able

This is a chapter draft of the sermon for Dr. King’s book Strength to Love. Using Jude 1:24 as his text, Dr. King expounds on his belief that there is a God of power that is able to sustain the universe, conquer the evils of history, and give us the interior resources to face the trials of life. He speaks of his own experience of turning to God when he was exhausted and overcome with fear after a telephone death threat. His inner peace restored, he was able calmly to accept the news three days later that his home had been bombed.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

A Call to Vietnam Week

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Frank Emspak, of the National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam, invites Dr. King to a convention to speak about his antiwar and pacifism sentiments.

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

Letter from Vivian Dilday to MLK

Friday, October 27, 1967

Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday writes Dr. King on behalf of the Committee on Benevolences of The Riverside Church in New York. Enclosed with the letter is a $1,000 check for the SCLC.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Letter to MLK from Guy Dauncey

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Guy Dauncey, Chairman of the Human Rights Committee at Nottingham University, offered this request for Dr. King to visit England, in March of 1968. The content, within the letter, placed emphasis on special events surrounding "Human Rights Year 1968", to begin a progressive Civil and Human Rights movement in England.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.

Social Ethics

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 3:15 while taking notes about social ethics. The passage that he quotes says that those who oppress others are sinning against God.

Prophecy (Micah)

Dr. King sketches notes on the prophet Micah, maintaining "...that the true prophet is one who draws his inspiration...from Jehovah his God."

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

Monday, June 26, 1967

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr.

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dora McDonald responds, on behalf of Dr. King, to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr. letter of April 20, 1966 regarding an invitation to speak at the Baptist Ministers Conference.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."