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Letter from A White Man to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

Writing under a pseudonym, "A White Man" lectures Dr. King about the race related conditions of the Chicago Park District. He or she calls this area "Heaven on Earth Surrounded by a Ghetto."

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Invitation to Dinner for General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Dr. King received this formal invitation to attend and be seated on the dais at The Family of Man Award Dinner in honor of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, at the Hotel Astor on 10/28/64.

Letter from some White Citizens of Mississippi to MLK about a Wedding

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

In this letter Mrs. A.N. Brown and several others express their interest in having Dr. King demonstrate in front of a church at which Lucy Johnson will be getting married.

Letter From Mattie M. Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Mattie Patterson congratulates Dr. King on the two awards he has recently received.

Letter from Mary Eunice to MLK

Saturday, June 13, 1964

Mary Eunice writes Dr. King offering her appreciation for the program he held in San Diego, California. Ms. Eunice notifies Dr. King that she will send him pictures from the program.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, informs Dr. King that President Kennedy is unable to meet on the suggested days due to his travels.

Letter from MLK to Arthur B. Jestice

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King declines a speaking engagement at the St. Andrew's Street Baptist Church due to some "programmatic plans." Dr. King asks if it is possible to meet in the future.

Letter from Morehouse College President to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Morehouse College President Dr. Benjamin E. Mays appeals to Dr. King to contribute to the school on the occasion of the college?s 100th anniversary.

Building A New Mississippi

This series of photos represent a plan to help rebuild Mississippi. The photos provide a blueprint and outline for strategical efforts to eradicate poverty and voting concerns.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

Monday, May 18, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Letter from T.J. Morrow to MLK

Monday, July 5, 1965

T.J. Morrow writes Dr. King in an effort to gain support for his film idea. Having already submitted it to a motion picture company and subsequently denied, Morrow hopes that King can help with promotion. He believes the film can offer positive messages of brotherhood and feels confident in its impact on society.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Telegram from Congressman Seymour Halpern to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

In this telegram to Dr. King in Selma jail, Congressman Seymour Halpern expresses his regret that he is unable to travel to Mississippi.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Donation Receipt

Thursday, January 13, 1966

This document is a receipt for a donation made to the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Letter from MLK to Roger Boone

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Dr. King thanks Roger Boone for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He emphasizes the importance of contributions like Boone's to the SCLC's ability to continue its work.

Proposal for Chicago Schools

This agenda outlines a strategic boycott of Chicago schools. The information is separated by three individual phases.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter to MLK from Dore Schary

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

In this letter, Dore Schary invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 52nd annual dinner of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith at which President Lyndon B. Johnson will receive the America's Democratic Legacy Award.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Transcendentalism

Dr. King provides background information on Ralph Waldo Emerson's theory of transcendentalism.