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Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

MLK's Transcript from Crozer Theological Seminary

Wednesday, December 6, 1950

In 1948, Dr. King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Engaging in a sincere quest for knowledge, he sought stimulation in the works of several prominent areas, like philosophy and theology. As a result of his efforts and achievements at Crozer, Dr. King was chosen as the Valedictorian of the graduating class of 1951.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King details royalty checks disbursed from the sale of "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Where Do We Go From Here Book Mailing

The people listed here received an advance copy of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," which was published in 1967.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Wiley Bell

Thursday, July 25, 1963

In this letter, Dr. King writes a thank you note to Mr. Bell for his support concerning "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Evil

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends" on the subject of evil.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

Letter from MLK to Griffin R. Simmons

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Dr. King informs Mr. Simmons, President of the Consolidate Association, that he will not be able to travel to New York to accept an award from the association due to the struggle in the South.

MLK Schedule

This schedule of Dr. King's lists the dates and places he will be for the month of September and October.

Pledge of Support from Thelma Rutherford

Wednesday, March 15, 1967

Thelma Rutherford, Missions Representative for the Church of the Savior in Washington D. C., pledges the churches support for Dr. King and the work of the SCLC. She encloses a check for $500.00 with this letter.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

Letter from Randall Elias to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Randall Elias offers the support of himself and the North Shore Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action for the civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield.

Letter from Rev. Jesse H. Williams to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Reverend Jesse H. Williams, Pastor of Saint Luke Community Christian Church, invites Dr. King to speak at his church.

SCLC Benefit Appeal

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King personally requests the support of forty organizations for SCLC's "Stars for Freedom" benefit. The appeal states that featured artists at the event include Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Sidney Portier, and Dr. King will also be speaking at the event.

Letter from Adam Powell to MLK

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Powell informs Dr. King how important he is to society and that he is in full support of his work. He also wishes to invite Dr. King to the next session of Congress for advice and ideas.

Letter from Robert Wacker to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Robert Wacker is highly distressed about housing discrimination in his neighborhood. In this letter to Dr. King, Wacker displays his determination towards eradicating segregated communities and encourages Dr. King to rally around this issue.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Letter from MLK to O. J. Tyler

Monday, April 9, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mr. Tyler for his words of encouragement and encloses an autographed photograph. Dr. King also sends his best wishes to the people he encountered in Virginia.