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Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

C. I. C Bosanquet, Vice Chancellor of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, expresses delight in Dr. King upcoming visit to receive an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree. He sends Dr. King a lists possible transportation options from London to the university and inquires about the length of his stay.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, October 29, 1965

Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.

Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."

Press Conference on the Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King and SCLC members have accepted the invitation to join the fight for a quality integrated education for the children of Chicago.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Walker

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ms. McDonald writes to Mr. Walker and states that Dr. King will accept the invitation to speak at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey on 10/25/67.

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Letter from Rev. William M. Brooks to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

William Brooks, Executive Director of the Gary Neighborhood House, requests Dr. King's permission for his staff to visit the SCLC Chicago office to observe their work being done in the slum areas.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

Saturday, October 1, 1960

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from David S. Tillson MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. Davis S. Tillson congratulates Dr. King on his statement regarding foreign policy.

Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

"HLS"

Thursday, March 28, 1968

"HLS" believes that Dr. King is wrong in thinking that the Republican Party will do more for African Americans than the Democratic Party.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Christianity

Dr. King writes about the concept of Christianity.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

Sunday, August 27, 1967

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Go to Black Africa

An unknown author writes to Dr. King advising that he return to Africa if he is unhappy with his plight in America.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Roebuck

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King informs Mr. Roebuck that he has misplaced Mr. Roebuck's check intended for the "Freedom Movement," and thanks him for his support while requesting a replacement check.

Mississippi Project

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Letter from Gloria Cantor to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Gloria Cantor, of Belafonte Enterprises, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting copies of Dr. King's speech at the Spring Mobilization.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

Saturday, December 17, 1966

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.

Telegram from MLK to Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph

Dr. King informs Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph that he will not be able to attend the emergency convocation. He also notes why this convocation is needed.