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MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.

Letter to the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh from Gloria Fraction

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Miss Gloria Fraction drafted this response to a correspondence, sent from the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, Michigan. Miss Fraction took the role as an additional secretary for Dr. King, while the SCLC underwent a major Open Housing Campaign Movement in Chicago in 1966. At the time this letter was written, SCLC operated out of their headquarters in Atlanta and their temporary offices in Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Rev. A. D. Evans

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. A. D. Evans and friends of St. Paul A.M.E. Church to thank them for their financial contribution of $500 to the SCLC. He discusses the current efforts of the organization such as Operation Breadbasket and the citizenship schools. Dr. King explains their monthly budget and the importance of supporters.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. J. M. Douglas

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Miss McDonald informs Dr. J. M. Douglas that she has discussed his invitation with Dr. King and that it will be placed in a special folder for further correspondence when there is availability in Dr. King's schedule.

God (Malachi)

Dr. King references various Bible passages that are related to God.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from E. Rawley to MLK

E. Rawley writes Dr. King stating, "you are judged by the company you keep." Furthermore, Rawley asserts that King will end up a "nothing" when he is on the brink of fame and respect.

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Letter from Reverend J. F. McMillan to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Reverend J. F. McMillan communicates with Reverend Artic Harris to discuss the sponsoring of Mrs. King in a recital for the three Negro Churches in Toronto. They have requested Dr. King to be the principal speaker for their 140th anniversary services. Reverend McMillan informs Dr. King that he is "interested" in the non-violent movement.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. T. Kane

Monday, March 25, 1968

In this letter, dated March 25, 1968, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the Kane's generous contribution of one hundred dollars to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

People In Action: The Complete Life

Saturday, April 27, 1963

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

Reason

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "The Finding of God."