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"ZAMBIA"

Letter from Student Mobilization Committee

The Student Mobilization Committee petitions for help to protest the war in Vietnam.

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milnor Alexander

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the kick-off celebration for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 50th Anniversary. A previous engagement in another section of the country prevents Dr. King from accepting. However, Dr. King would later speak for the organization in Philadelphia. Coretta Scott King was a key member and sponsor of the league.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes from Hegel's "The Philosophy of History."

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

Jefferson County Jail Guidelines

The Jefferson County Jail guidelines are listed in this document.

Sin

Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

Letter to Dr. Mays Regarding United Negro College Fund

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Dr. King's secretary sends a check for $150 to Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays for the United Negro College Fund. The letter states that Dr. King's pledge will total $700 with the balance paid on or before February 18, 1967.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

The Categories

Dr. King contemplates the fourth level of ontological concepts, which focus on the categories of thought and being. Referencing Paul Tillich, King notes the categories that are most relevant to theology.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates

Dr. King composes a draft for a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates. He expresses his appreciation for their contribution and encouraging words. He discusses the SCLC's support of other organizations that are consistent with Judeo-Christian values and conveys their dedication to equality.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, March 30, 1964

Frazer Earle from the Canadian Council of Christian and Jews Inc. invites Dr. King to their Annual Banquet.

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

History and Human Nature

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" on the rebellion against rationalism's interpretation of human nature.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

Letter from MLK to Arthur B. Jestice

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King declines a speaking engagement at the St. Andrew's Street Baptist Church due to some "programmatic plans." Dr. King asks if it is possible to meet in the future.