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"ZAMBIA"

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Alabama (AL)

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Letter to Mrs. Levi Hamiliton from Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 15, 1963
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald informs Levi Hamilton that Dr. King perceived the mayor's appointment of a bi-racial committee as ""heartwarming." Furthermore, Ms. McDonald notifies Mrs. Hamilton that Dr. King is unable to commit to a date to come and speak in Goldsboro.

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958
Brooklyn, NY, Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Julia Smith

Tuesday, January 16, 1962
Michigan (MI)

Dora McDonald responds to Julia Smith's letter on behalf of Dr. King and informs Smith that they hope she accomplishes her dream of becoming a nurse. Miss McDonald also tells Smith that they will remember her in their prayers.

Letter from James Haughton to a Friend regarding Fundraising

Thursday, February 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter James Houghton, of the Committee for a Winter Confrontation with Congress, appeals to friends for financial support of the "poor peoples lobby."

Letter from Erik Ruden to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Stockholm, Sweden, Atlanta, GA

Upon learning of Dr. King's speaking engagement at the upcoming World Council meeting in Uppsala, Sweden, Ruden invites him to an additional meeting at luncheon or area Baptist Church.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966
Chicago, IL

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to A. K. Salz

Thursday, August 20, 1964
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Salz for his financial contribution to the SCLC and explains that the contribution will help the SCLC continue its civil rights efforts.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

Friday, September 9, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962
GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MALAWI

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Reports of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam

Thursday, July 6, 1967
Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

The International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace issues a report of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam. Within the report, an appeal to the world is made on behalf of Vietnam and a resolution is offered to outline the ways in which a settlement can be reached between the United States and Vietnam.

Royalty Statement for Where Do We Go From Here

Friday, August 4, 1967
New York, NY

Dr. King is receiving a check in the amount of $1048.50 in advance for the German Language edition of Where Do We Go From Here.

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
Denver, CO, CYPRUS

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Statement by MLK

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

Special Message to the Members of Congress

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Maryland (MD)

In this letter, John Doyle Elliott, a national pension lobbyist, informs members of congress what he feels can end the loss of income. According to this letter, attached was the Pay-As-You-Go Social Security and Prosperity Insurance Act.

Suffering

Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.

Mastering Our Fears

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959
Iowa (IA), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Financial Breakdown of Individual Contributors

Dr. King lists the monetary calculations of those who have individually contributed to the "Souvenir Program."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.