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"ZAMBIA"

Letter to President Johnson about the Murder of Jonathan Daniels

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
New Hampshire (NH), Alabama (AL)

This letter from Keene, New Hampshire to President Johnson is in response to the murder of Rev. Jonathan Daniels, an Episcopal seminary student from Boston. Daniels was born in Keene. The letter mentions other murdered civil rights workers, condemns Southern justice and calls upon the President to introduce legislation permitting federal investigation and prosecution of racial violence.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
New York, NY

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967
VIETNAM, CHINA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965
CANADA

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

Telegram from John E. Fogarty to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

In this telegram, John E. Fogarty writes Dr. King in support of the Administration Bill.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Letter from Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Tuesday, May 24, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Nickolas W. Dick writes Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Frank H. Epp extending an invitation to the Reverend to hold a series of meetings in Winnipeg. Dick closes by requesting confirmation of the extent of his stay.

Letter from Stanley Slota to MLK

Arizona (AZ)

Stanley Slota writes Dr. King to acknowledge how proud he is of him and expresses his desire for more people to give back to the poor.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Kansas (KS)

Mrs. Gossett writes to Martin Luther King Jr, regarding his article in Look Magazine. Throughout the letter Mrs. Gossett also references issues regarding old age assistance, social security and pensions.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Monday, March 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

Telegram from Charles McDew to MLK

Thursday, September 13, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Charles McDew petitions the assistance of Dr. King in pursuing a federal investigation of the shootings of several civil rights activists in Mississippi and Southwest Georgia. Charles McDew issued this telegram as a representative of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Miracles

EGYPT, ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

Weatherhead on Love

Dr. King records a quote from Leslie Dixon Weatherhead's "Why Men Suffer."

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Letter of Support from Dr. May Chinn to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

On a recent vacation, Dr. Chinn attended a "friends meeting" in a small town outside of Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. Chinn noticed that Dr. King's teachings and spiritual dedication had profoundly influenced that community. He states that Dr. King has inspired people both in that town and around the world, and that he is "everyone's leader."

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), BERMUDA

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Columbus, OH, Cleveland, OH

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Rev. George W. Gunn

Friday, August 6, 1965
Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA)

Reverend Andrew Young informs Reverend George Gunn of the Presbyterian University Center that he will not be in attendance at the Campus Ministry Association meeting due to an emergency situation in Americus, Georgia that requires his special attention.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Atlantic City, NJ

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

At Your Service!

Washington, D.C.

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Contribution Letter from Motown Records

Thursday, September 5, 1963
Detroit, MI

As indicated in a recording agreement with Dr. King, Esther Edwards, Vice President of Motown Records, sends $200.00 to the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

London, England

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.