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"ZAMBIA"

Letter from James M. Force to Dora McDonald

Friday, April 28, 1967

James M. Force, Public Information Coordinator for the University of Wisconsin, requests that Dr. King consider allowing his speech scheduled for May 12, 1967 be broadcast over the radio. WSAU Radio expresses interest in carrying Dr. King's speech live. WHA Radio, operated by the University of Wisconsin, requests permission to tape the speech for later broadcast.

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

Letter from Marshall C. Dendy to the SCLC

Monday, October 23, 1967

In this document dated 10/23/1967, Marshall C. Dandy writes to Dr. King and the rest of the SCLC, enclosed is a check from "A Fellowship of Concern".

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Ball

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the Inaugural Ball following the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Letter from Roger Bobley to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Roger Bobley, Revision Editor for the Illustrated World Encyclopedia, writes Dr. King asking him to submit a report on the "goals, importance and achievements of the Civil Rights movement in America."

Letter of Support from New Jersey Resident

Monday, April 10, 1967

Writing a third party, the author of this letter voices his support for Dr. King and his views on the Vietnam war.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

Telegram from MLK to Mattie Tillman

Dr. King expresses his condolences to Mattie Tillman for the death of her husband. Dr. King states that he will always be remembered for his influence in the Atlanta University community.

Letter from Manie Callahan to MLK

Sunday, January 13, 1963

Manie Callahan expresses her admiration to Dr. King and informs him of the passing of her parents which left her with a five bedroom apartment. Callahan understands the lack of opportunity for Negroes in the south and offers her home to a deserving married couple looking for work. She trusts Dr. King's judgment of character and hopes to hear from him soon.

Letter from Ray Fritsch to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Ray Fritsch of Illinois Wesleyan University writes Dr. King to inform him that the university is "participating in Time Magazine's Choice 68' primary election" and requests campaign material.

Certificate Honoring MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

This certificate serves to honor MLK for his contributions "in the field of racial relations."

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from MLK to Gerald A. Feffer

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King informs Gerald A. Feffer that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Lehigh University. King states, "I can think of nothing that I enjoy more than discussing some of the vital issues of the day with college and university students."

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Leonard E. Loper to MLK

Saturday, June 8, 1963

Leonard Loper, of Mount Zion Baptist Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can be the keynote speaker for the church's Men's Day service.

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.

Letter from Louise Boyer to Mrs. Arthur Logan

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Louise Boyer writes on behalf of Governor Nelson Rockefeller informing Mrs. Arthur Logan that a contribution check is enclosed for the SCLC.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Member of SCLC to James Harrison

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

The letter's author encloses copies of recent checks made payable to the SCLC and contact information for individual and organizational contributors.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Monday, January 24, 1966

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.