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Class Syllabus: Sociology of Religion

This portion of a syllabus lists the basic bibliography and outline for the Sociology of Religion course taught by Kenneth Underwood. Included are several well known authors that influenced Dr. King's studies, e.g. Paul Tillich and Reinhold Niebuhr.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.

Zwingli, H.

Dr. King records biographical information about Swiss reformer Ulrich (or Huldrych) Zwingli.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Sin (Augustine's definition)

Dr. King records a note on St. Augustine's definition sin, referencing passages from Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation," volume 1: "Human Nature."

Dynamics

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's definition of "dynamics" from his book Systematic Theology.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Exodus

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.

Exodus

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Man (His Need for God)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Schleiermacher (Christianity)

Dr. King cites a quote by philosopher Schleiermacher regarding "the God-consciousness."

Schleiermacher (Religion & Ethics)

Dr. King quotes and writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view in “Speeches on Religion” that criticizing a man’s actions is not criticizing his religion because he does not act from his religion. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Environmental Influence

Dr. King contemplates "environmental influence" by comparing Spencer and Darwin.

Evil

Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Notecard Regarding Semi-Pelagianism

Dr. King writes notes regarding Semi-Pelagianism, which is "a movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination."

Class Notes Psalms

Dr. King writes several scriptures from the Book of Psalms found in the Old Testament of the Bible.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

Sacrifice

Dr. King cites passages from Leviticus that suggest that the smell of sacrifice is pleasing to God.

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

God

Dr. King writes about God's love according to Ezra 3:11.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

God

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."