Themes

The Archive

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"Education"

Morehouse College's Standing Among 192 Colleges

This document ranks Morehouse College against other colleges in a variety of areas, including endowment, number of Ph.D's on the faculty, and graduates with Ph.D's.

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

Supralapsarianism

Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.

Capitalism

Dr. King references Karl Marx's thoughts on capitalism.

John of Damascus

This notecard contains historical information regarding John of Damascus and outlines some principles of his religious philosophy.

Agnosticism

Dr. King quotes Ernst Haeckel's "The Riddle of the Universe."

Syllabus In Christian Education

This syllabus outlines the various elements of a course entitled "Christian Education" from Dr. King's experience at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Watson

Dr. King references behaviorist John B. Watson regarding man's behavior.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Jesus Christ (good will)

Dr. King references H. Richard Niebuhr's statement, "Christ is the Rosetta Stone of Christianity." He also talks about archaeological discoveries and translating languages.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Leslie Dixon Weatherhead’s “Why Do Men Suffer?”

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

Homogeneous Thoughts & Heterogeneous Thoughts

Dr. King describes Alfred North Whitehead's distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous thought in "The Concept of Nature."

God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 29:13-14, noting that man can find God if he searches with all his heart.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

Man (sinfulness)

Dr. King explains the sinfulness of man with a quote from the book of Psalms.

Transcripts for Courses at Harvard University

Thursday, August 13, 1953

Lois Ryan forwards a transcript for two courses that Dr. King took while studying at Harvard University. These courses were Philosophy of Plate: Introductory and The Philosophy of Whitehead.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Man (Cause of Sin)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”