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Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Three Stages of Christological Controversy

Dr. King lists three stages of Christological controversy. The third is the "relation" between the former two.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

The Categories

Dr. King contemplates the fourth level of ontological concepts, which focus on the categories of thought and being. Referencing Paul Tillich, King notes the categories that are most relevant to theology.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Peace

Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Sin

Dr. King provides insight on the "secret of sin."

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

Aristotle

Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

Aristotle

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Aristotelian philosophy.

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Social Gospel

New York (NY)

Dr. King defines social gospel with a quotation from Shailer Mathews and G. B. Smith's "A Dictionary of Religion and Ethics."

Man's Dilemma

Dr. King states that man’s dilemma results from “the divorce of nature from the supernatural.”

Knudson

Dr. King cites a publication by theologian Albert Knudson.

Man

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology” on man as the telos (purpose) of creation.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Nationalism

Dr. King cites a biblical scripture from the book of Isaiah where it is asserted that "God's house is to be a house of prayer for all people."

Brotherhood

Dr. King cites a quote that exemplifies the necessity of understanding human connection. Emphasizing brotherhood, he notes man's inherent dependence on others.