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"Speeches"

At the Beginning of the Youth Leadership Conference

Friday, April 15, 1960

While speaking to the Youth Leadership Conference in Raleigh, NC, Dr. King elaborates on the student sit-in movements, which he says served as a representation of the plight of the American Negro regarding their struggle for justice. Dr. King further lists the various details of their strategy for victory.

World's Fair "Stall-In"

Dr. King comments on a civil rights demonstration scheduled to be held at the World Fair. This united act is aimed to address Negro civil concerns in relation to unified housing, education, and employment.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

MLK Address at Dinner Honoring Jackie Robinson

Friday, July 20, 1962

This is the transcript of Dr. King's address at the 1962 Hall of Fame Dinner honoring Jackie Robinson in New York City. Dr. King praises Robinson for standing up for civil rights as the first Negro to break Major League Baseball's color barrier.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

MLK Addresses the Atlanta Press Club

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Dr. King discusses the struggle for racial justice and the concept of goodwill with the Atlanta Press Club. He stresses that any opposition in the fight for equality will inevitably fail in the face of a unified effort across America.

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.