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"Speeches"

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King states that the key to an extended and fulfilling life is to live a life that is "three dimensional." He further identifies these dimensions as: "length, breadth and height." Dr. King proclaims these dimensions will ensure a life of self-love, community and love for God.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 3, 1959

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

MLK Address at Dinner Honoring Jackie Robinson

Friday, July 20, 1962

This is the transcript of Dr. King's address at the 1962 Hall of Fame Dinner honoring Jackie Robinson in New York City. Dr. King praises Robinson for standing up for civil rights as the first Negro to break Major League Baseball's color barrier.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

MLK's Statement on Church Bombing in Leesburg, GA

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

MLK expresses his clear disgust with the actions of the civil rights resisters, denouncing their bombing of a local church.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

MLK on the Republican Nomination of Barry Goldwater

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Dr. King issued this statement regarding the "unfortunate and disastrous" Republican Party's nomination of Senator Barry Goldwater for the Presidency of the United States. The Reverend expounds on his disapproval of the nomination by stating that he represents an unrealistic conservation that is totally out of touch with the realities of the twentieth century.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

Saturday, October 5, 1957

Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

The American Dream

Sunday, February 10, 1963

This document contains the text of an address that Dr. King gave at Plymouth Church of The Pilgrims in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King describes the steps that should be taken in order to make the American Dream a reality.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

MLK Announcement of Rally to be held in San Francisco

Dr. King announces the details for a rally in San Francisco, California to garner support for the pending Civil Rights Bill in Congress. He makes a call to action for various diverse groups to join in this initiative.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Tenth Annual Convention

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Dr. King addresses the achievements the SCLC has accomplished over the past ten years at the Tenth Annual Convention in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King then speaks on the fact that all of the SCLC's achievements are accomplished through nonviolence.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

Speech to National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.