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MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Richard Parrish and Daniel H. Watts Press Release on William Worthy Passport Case

Monday, October 22, 1962

This news release announces plans to picket the American Jewish Congress Award Banquet held for Attorney General Robert Kennedy at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. The Attorney General is to receive an award "for advancing human freedom."

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

People to People

Dr. King announces the SCLC's launching of a People to People tour of four northern cities. The SCLC launched this tour in the north to display a concern for the "moral welfare of Northern Negroes."

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

The American Dream

Sunday, February 10, 1963

This document contains the text of an address that Dr. King gave at Plymouth Church of The Pilgrims in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King describes the steps that should be taken in order to make the American Dream a reality.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.

Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Monday, June 23, 1958

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

The Other America

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.