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"Correspondence"

Initiative for Peace In Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire detail the origins of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its action plan. As they explain, a group of Norwegian citizens approached living Nobel Peace Prize winners to develop a project focusing on achieving peace in Vietnam. To reach that goal, the initiative plans to send representatives to each group involved with the conflict in Vietnam.

I Will Vote For You

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Joe Kozne proclaims allegiance to Dr. King and his political aspirations if George Wallace, the governor of Alabama, runs for presidency.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Mississippi (MS)

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Correspondence from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, BELGIUM, FRANCE

Joan Daves writes Dr. King and attaches a letter from Pierre Servais, a publisher who plans to translate King's book "Strength to Love" to French. Servais also inquires if Dr. King can visit Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe, as his appearance would create an excellent opportunity to launch the sale of his book.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

Friday, October 11, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962
Indiana (IN)

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Letter from James Dodd to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

James Dodd of the Sacramento NAACP invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker for their Life Membership Awards Banquet. The theme of the dinner is "The Man and the Times."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
New York, NY

AFON received a grant of $60,000 from the Stern Family Fund. Mr. Wachtel offers Mr. Hunter a report of progress and invites him to a conference concerning the grant.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
New York, NY

Mr. Hillyer and his children Nitra, Linda, and Jonathan send a donation of thirty-five dollars to Dr. King, in memory of the late Mrs. Hillyer.

Letter to Miss Tower Regarding Dr. King's Book

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
Kentucky (KY)

In this brief note, Thomas Merton expresses gratitude to Ms. Tower for gifting him with Dr. King's new book. Merton, a contemplative monk, provides a statement possibly to appear as an endorsement of sorts and requests copies of the edition when it is made available.

Work Summary of Rachel Davis DuBoise

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Louisville, KY, Nashville, TN, Columbus, OH, Richmond, VA, Indiana (IN)

This document is a brief work summary for Rachel Davis DuBoise as a member of the Dialogue Department of SCLC covering the periods from November 1965 to October 1966.

Letter from Murillo Millin to SCLC

Friday, April 20, 1962
New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Murillo Millin, President of the Van Buren Block Association, Inc., makes a contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Thursday, February 3, 1064
Washington, D.C.

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

Wednesday, July 31, 1963
Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Letter fom Edmond Jansson to the Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Washington (WA), Utah (UT), Chicago, IL

Edmond Jansson writes a letter to the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee contradicting a report on how Roy Wilkins was treated in Salt Lake City, Utah. A copy was sent to Dr. King.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Texas (TX)

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC)

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1963
Indiana (IN), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.