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"Correspondence"

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

DENMARK

Dr. King's secretary forwards him information for an event in Copenhagen in which his presence is requested. Dr. King's brief response is indicated on the top of the memo.

Save the Children of Mississippi Resolutions

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Barbara Greene issues a memo for the Ad Hoc Committee to Save the Children of Mississippi that includes resolutions to protest federal funding cutbacks of Head Start programs in Mississippi and interpretation of the Green Amendment regarding maximizing participation in such programs by the poor. She attaches a copy of a telegram sent to Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Letter from H. Carl Moultrie to MLK

Saturday, January 25, 1964
Washington, D.C., Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

H. Carl Moultrie invites Dr. King or another representative to participate in a panel discussion as a part of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity's Annual Grand Conclave. Moultrie also provides brief information about the fraternity.

Letter from MLK to Geraldine Fothergill

Monday, February 25, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King informs Mrs. Fothergill that her idea to house African American students through a coordinated church effort has merit. He suggests that she contact Reverend Richard Battles of the Mount Olives Baptist Church in Hartford, Connecticut, who is a representative of the SCLC and gauge his reaction to the idea.

Letter from Harper & Row Publishers to Joan Daves

Friday, March 10, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row, Publishers representative Cass Canfield provides feedback about Dr. King's manuscript for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" to Joan Daves, Dr. King's agent. Canfield suggests replacing the last chapter of of the draft with a briefer and less expansive final section.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

Thursday, December 30, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

New York, NY, SOUTH AFRICA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS)

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Wachtel informs Dr. King that a large donation made by Mrs. Ann Farnsworth is now available. Wachtel then asks Dr. King who is to send the acknowledgment.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Brooklyn, NY

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Coretta's Personal Story

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL)

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

Friday, April 7, 1967
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Robert L. Green writes to Dr. King concerning "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Note to MLK

Atlanta, GA

This note is requesting help from Dr. King in finding a candidate to fulfill a pastoral position at a church in Atlanta.

Letter from David B. Lord to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Jacksonville, FL, London, England, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ), Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

In this letter to Dr. King , David B. Lord draws connections between the Vietnam War and poverty in American society. He agrees with Dr. King's stance on the war and approach to civil rights. According to Mr. Lord, real civil rights progress cannot be made until a solution is found to the war.

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Stern Shanis

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald acknowledges Harry Shanis' earlier letter. She sends a photograph of Dr. King along with a biographical sketch.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

SCLC Statement from Director of Communications

Monday, April 1, 1968
Memphis, TN

Tom Offenburger, SCLC spokesperson, releases a statement to the SCLC staff on future plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Memphis, Tennessee. Plans include marches and boycotts despite "brutal" actions on the behalf of Memphis police.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."