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"Correspondence"

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Letter from Andrew Heiskell to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Mr. Heiskell extends an invitation for Dr. King to join Mayors of major cities and other national leaders in forming a coalition to address urban problems.

Letter from Jacob Broertjes to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 7, 1964

Jacob Broertjes informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King will speak at two sessions for the European Baptist Federations. The services will be brought to various European countries via television. Mr. Broertjes details the intricacies of Dr. King's visit.

Letter from Faye Drake to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965

Fay Drake of the Youth Department of the St. John Evangelist Baptist Church invites Dr. King to the church's Negro History Week celebration.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from W. Daniels to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

W. Daniels corresponds to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak in Montreal at the Grand Master's Banquet on August 13, 1968.

Letter from George Russell to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

George Russel offers his support for any endeavor Dr. King would assign him.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Rochester Action for Welfare Rights

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King is invited to make an appearance on behalf of the Rochester Action for Welfare Rights. They explain that they have also extended an invitation to Reverend Bernard Lafayette to attend the event.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Christmas Card from the King Family

Coretta Scott King sends out a Christmas card from herself and her children.

Letter from William T. Chapman to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

William T. Chapman, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity of Knoxville College, requests Dr. King's response concerning his involvement with their program.

September 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s secretary writes Joan Daves to inform her of his absence.

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dora McDonald, secretary to Dr. King, wrote Joan Daves to inform her that Dr. King will look into the request from Philip Unwin upon his return from Berlin.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter from Nancy Davison to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Nancy Davison writes Dr. King to thank him for his words published in Ramparts. She writes that she finds it thrilling to be able read his own words instead of quotations used by others out of context. She thanks him for the stance he has taken on Vietnam, for fighting injustice, and for "having the courage to reveal what is in your heart."

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

Support Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

New York Governor, Nelson A. Rockefeller, and Happy [Rockefeller] had the opportunity to spend time with Dr. King and his family after the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremonies. Admist the renewal of personal attacks against Dr. King, Nelson Rockefeller offers his support and encouragement.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Tom to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 27, 1967

Tom suggests to Dora McDonald that Dr. King accept ABC's invitation to appear on the show "Issues and Answers."