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Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962
GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MALAWI

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Colorado (CO)

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Soap, Brush Help

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Thursday, September 20, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC)

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

Friday, October 1, 1965
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), Detroit, MI, FRANCE, Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, Louisiana (LA), Michigan (MI), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY, North Carolina (NC), Oklahoma (OK), San Francisco, CA, Selma, AL, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), VIETNAM, Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

Friday, November 5, 1965
Chicago, IL

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY)

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), New York (NY), Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966
VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Progressives to Face Important Issues in Birmingham

Monday, October 31, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Cincinnati, OH, Memphis, TN, Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

This news release details a meeting of the Progressive National Baptist Convention's Southern Regional in Birmingham, Alabama. Reverend Martin King, Sr. is one of the many pastors participating.

Battle of Economic Opportunity

Friday, November 17, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this New York Post article, the author provides a perspective of the events leading to the Economic Opportunity Act as it pertains to both opposing sides; Democratic and Republican.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

Birmingham, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, North Carolina (NC), CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Birmingham, AL, LIBERIA, Detroit, MI

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Wisconsin (WI)

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962
Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), INDIA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964
Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.