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WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

The Burning Truth in the South

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

People In Action: "Virginia's Black Belt"

Saturday, April 14, 1962

In this article from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King describes his expereince on his "People to People" tour through the United States, noting his experience in the "black belt" in Virginia.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

A Call to Vietnam Week

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.