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Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, California (CA), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), CANADA

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

Wednesday, June 10, 1964
Montgomery, AL

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Mississippi College Gets Poverty Role

Friday, October 7, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) moves to remove the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) as the sponsor of pre-school antipoverty programs in the state. Sargent Shriver announces that Rust College will receive funding to administer the Head Start program in Marshall and Lafayette Counties of Mississippi. CDGM was one of the most important Head Start initiatives in the country, providing early childhood education, nutritional services, health care and other services to thousands.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS)

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Justice Harlan Concurring

Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC)

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964
Birmingham, AL

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Newspaper Article: "Giving Away a Library"

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL

This Chicago's Sunday AMERICAN newspaper article discusses the issue concerning the decision of the Chicago Law Institute to give the government their legal library without the consent of the membership.

TV: Return of Susskind

Monday, October 3, 1966
New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL

This article reviews a series of television shows that aired on various networks dealing with politics and race relations. Among the programs mentioned is a segment featuring Senator Kennedy as well as a documentary entitled "The Agony of Two Cities" centered on segregation.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MEXICO, CUBA, Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Louisville, KY, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Texas (TX), INDIA, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, Detroit, MI, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Pittsburgh, PA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C.

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

Monday, November 22, 1965
Tennessee (TN), SOUTH AFRICA, Los Angeles, CA, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Pittsburgh, PA, New York (NY)

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

News Release About Upcoming Lecture by Coretta Scott King

Georgia (GA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This news release announces Coretta Scott King's upcoming lecture on the Crusade for Voter's Registration entitled "Free in 64-with 6,000 more."

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Washington, D.C.

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Colorado (CO)

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Urban League Feeling a Financial Squeeze

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Chicago, IL

This article focuses on the Chicago Urban League's struggle to gain financial support from contributors. According to the organization's director Edwin C. Berry, former contributors failed to accept the fact that the goals and scope of the league would preclude the organization from becoming a "protest group."

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.