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U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

New York, NY, Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Progressives to Face Important Issues in Birmingham

Monday, October 31, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Cincinnati, OH, Memphis, TN, Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

This news release details a meeting of the Progressive National Baptist Convention's Southern Regional in Birmingham, Alabama. Reverend Martin King, Sr. is one of the many pastors participating.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

California (CA), Texas (TX)

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), Kansas (KS)

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Mississippi College Gets Poverty Role

Friday, October 7, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) moves to remove the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) as the sponsor of pre-school antipoverty programs in the state. Sargent Shriver announces that Rust College will receive funding to administer the Head Start program in Marshall and Lafayette Counties of Mississippi. CDGM was one of the most important Head Start initiatives in the country, providing early childhood education, nutritional services, health care and other services to thousands.

The Martin Luther King Column

GERMANY

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, California (CA), Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

MLK Cited in Damage Suit

Sunday, September 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The New York Times reports that Dr. King is one of the defendants in a $15 Million law suit.

My Dream

Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Marching for Unilateral Disarmament, San Francisco to Moscow

Monday, October 15, 1962
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, San Francisco, CA, FRANCE, BELGIUM, California (CA), NORWAY, Los Angeles, CA, Arizona (AZ), Los Angeles, CA

This article reports on the six thousand mile march from San Francisco to Moscow, an idea that emerged during a Polaris Action demonstration in New England. The marchers spent six months crossing the United States at a rate of 17 to 25 miles per day for an estimated total of 4,000 miles.

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Washington, D.C.

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

People in Action: Albany Justice

CUBA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

Washington, D.C.

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK)

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962
London, England, Pittsburgh, PA

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Let My People Vote

New York, NY, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.