Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Articles"

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967
California (CA), Nebraska (NE), Nashville, TN, Louisville, KY, New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

A Look to 1964

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

Washington, D.C., California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Minnesota (MN), Washington (WA), San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, CUBA, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Special to the New York Times: A Cry of Hate or a Cry for Help

Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD, California (CA), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses the recent riots occurring in the county of Watts near Los Angeles. He believes the riots are not solely race-driven but are also motivated by unemployment. The riots are utilized as a way to be heard, and not as a way to destroy.

The Burning Truth in the South

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Montgomery, AL

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

New York, NY, Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963
GEORGIA, Washington, D.C.

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

CHINA, INDIA, JAPAN, New Delhi, India, New York, NY, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), RUSSIAN FEDERATION

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Selma, AL

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Inquirer: "Not Accepting White Help Black Power Weakness"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Atlanta Inquirer released this review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review highlighted important issues transcribed in Dr. King's book. The most important issue, highlighted in the review, involved his views on the conflicts of the black power movement. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was released in 1967.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), GHANA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE, New Delhi, India, SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

Jackson, MS

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
Washington, D.C.

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

Amsterdam Article

Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Philadelphia, MS, Jackson, MS, Greenwood, MS

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

How Dodd Differs From Powell/Dwellings Toured

Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The newspaper article entitled, "How Dodd Differs From Powell," examines how differently Senator J. Dodd and Congressman Adam C. Powell were treated after a major controversy. This controversy resulted in the removal of Congressman Powell from office.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Article regarding MLK

Chicago, IL

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

VIETNAM

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

People In Action: "Virginia's Black Belt"

Saturday, April 14, 1962
Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Prince Edward County, VA, Washington, D.C.

In this article from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King describes his expereince on his "People to People" tour through the United States, noting his experience in the "black belt" in Virginia.