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Amsterdam Article

Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Philadelphia, MS, Jackson, MS, Greenwood, MS

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

The Negro is the Most Glaring Evidence of White American's Hypocrisy

Dr. King shares the desire and need of American Negroes to have a social revolution for equality.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Lawyer Fined $50 in Inquiry Ouster

Saturday, August 20, 1966
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

New York lawyer, Arthur Kinoy, was carried out of the courtroom by authorities for disorderly conduct. Mr. Kinoy made history as this had never happened before in the legal system.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), New York (NY), Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Des Moines, IA, Iowa (IA), CONGO / ZAIRE, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956
Montgomery, AL, CHINA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, JAPAN

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, CANADA, BELGIUM, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, SWITZERLAND, NIGERIA, New York, NY, EGYPT, ISRAEL, Pennsylvania (PA), Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Denver, CO, Texas (TX)

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

New York (NY), Little Rock, AR

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Denver, CO, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, GERMANY, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, POLAND, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, CANADA, FRANCE, CUBA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, VENEZUELA, South Carolina (SC)

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Louisiana (LA)

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, California (CA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Commentary on MLK Article

Indiana (IN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

The Blame in Birmingham

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

New York, NY, Chicago, IL

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington (WA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, ITALY, Detroit, MI, Delaware (DE), Louisville, KY, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., KENYA, Tennessee (TN)

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

Washington, D.C.

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962
London, England, Pittsburgh, PA

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962
GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MALAWI

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962
Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Chattanooga, TN, Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Jackson, MS, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Ohio (OH), Shreveport, LA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.