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Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Catherine Aller writes Dr. King regarding his awareness of agape and its "historic appearance on the Day of Pentecost."

Worship

Dr. King notes some characteristics and requirements of worship.

Letter from Leon Levy to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1961

Leon Levy congratulates Dr. King on his leadership and the efforts of the SCLC. Mr. Levy contributes to the organization and states that he follows Dr. King's work with interest.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Letter to MLK from John Yeatman

Saturday, May 6, 1967

John Yeatman sends his gratitude for all of Dr. King's efforts in teaching peace and wishes him well in every endeavor.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Correspondence: Letter to Mr.Foner from Dr.King (Feb. 26, 1968)

Sunday, February 25, 1968

Dr. King sends a contribution to Moe Foner to help in the efforts for peace in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1961

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

Van Til, Cornelius

Dr. King cites Cornelius Van Til's "The New Modernism."

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

A Note with no Addressee from the Desk of Joan Daves

A note on Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, letterhead to an unaddressed recipient about Japanese annotations of "Strength to Love."

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Letter from MLK to Louis Pollak

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes a recommendation letter for Alan B. Watchel to Dean Louis Pollak of Yale Law School. Dr. King highlights the contributions that Mr. Watchel has made to support the struggle for human dignity and equality.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Poetry

Dr. King quotes Shelley's views on poetry from the book "Defiance of Poetry."

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Letter from MLK to Paul Madsen

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King informs Reverend Paul O. Madsen that he does not have availability to work for the Home Missions Societies of the American Baptist Convention because he is very busy with the civil rights struggle.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Letter from Ella Jackson to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

Miss Ella Jackson, a 7th grader, writes to Dr. King concerning his leadership and involvement in civil disobedience. She advises Dr. King to speak to someone in power, otherwise his actions will lead to war.

Letter from Librarian Olive Ann Tamborelle to MLK

Tuesday, October 26, 1965

Olive Ann Tamborelle, Director of the Teaneck Public Library, asks Dr. King to name the book that has had the greatest effect on his life, other than The Bible. She informs him that the information will be used in an exhibit for National Library Week.

God (Isaiah)

Dr. King provides text from the Old Testament book of Isaiah highlighting the "ethical nature of God."

Letter from Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard, Minister of the Washington Street A. M. E. Zion Church, encloses a contribution to assist with Dr. King's efforts to help blacks achieve liberty.

Philadelphia Chapter of CORE Flyer

This flyer encourages participation in the reformation of the Philadelphia School System.

Letter from The Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club to Dr. King

Thursday, October 2, 1958

Samuel Baskerville, of the Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club, wrote to Dr. King out of sympathy, for his nearly fatal stabbing at a department store in Harlem. Mr. Baskerville, on behalf of his organization, conveyed their delight in knowing of Dr. King's survival, per various press releases.