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Letter to MLK from Alfred E.Field

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Indiana (IN)

Mr. Field, President, Indiana Memorial Union Board of Directors, writes to inform Dr. King that IMU will act as the local sponsor for TIME Magazine's National Presidential Primary, Choice 68, on April 24th. Ironically, the letter is dated April 3,1968 which is one day prior to his tragic end.

Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children

Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, VIETNAM

The Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children announces a program that will bring war-maimed children from Vietnam to the United Stares for medical treatment.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

"A Knock At Midnight"

Sunday, August 9, 1964
New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Montgomery, AL

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

VIETNAM

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from MLK to John Williams Mannix

Monday, September 23, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Mannix that he will not be able to speak in Washington for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Letter from Max Tak to MLK

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
NETHERLANDS, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Tak requests a statement for the Elseviers Weekblad cover story titled, "Is Satan Still Alive?" from Dr. King.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA)

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter from Bret Harte Junior High School to MLK

Tuesday, October 3, 1967
California (CA)

The eighth grade class from Bret Harte Junior High School writes to Dr.King to inquire about his opinion on race relations. The students expressed that they believed that Negros deserve equal rights.

Forgiveness and Repentance

Dr. King reviews a passage from the Book of Ezekiel regarding forgiveness and repentance. Summarizing the verse, he states that repentance involves an "actual change of attitude" and forgiveness includes forgetting past mistakes.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Thursday, October 14, 1965
FRANCE, PUERTO RICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Hayward sends Dr. King a brief note on what has been keeping him so busy and hopes that while Dr. King is in Pars, they will be able to meet.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

Geneva, Switzerland

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

Letter from Rev. Sterling E. Glover and Rev. Henry Payden to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Reverend Glover informs Dr. King that he was surprised to hear that a statement was released regarding the planned summer conference. It was Reverend Glover's impression that no information would be released to the press, so that relations between the United Pastors Association and the SCLC would not be tainted.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Letter from Saul Miller to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Saul Miller, Director of the Department of Publications for the AFL-CIO, writes Dr. King requesting him to write a description of the activities of the SCLC. This write-up will be featured in the November issue of the AFL-CIO magazine, which will be devoted entirely to the issue of civil rights.

Letter from Juniata College to MLK

Thursday, June 4, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Robert E. Faus of Juniata College address Dora McDonald concerning the possibility of securing Dr. King for their religious convocation. Mr. Faus inquires about the status of Dr. King's schedule for the school year.

Correspondence from SCLC to Episcopal House of Prayer Church

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

This is a letter of appreciation for contributions to the SCLC.

Telegram from Burton Mousman to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Burton Mousman urges Dr. King to accept an invitation for an approaching speaking engagement at the CALTECH YMCA.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Boston, MA

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Voting Rights

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Washington, D.C.

President Johnson offers his gratitude to Dr. King for supporting his advocacy before Congress of legislation guaranteeing universal voting rights.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, South Dakota (SD)

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.