Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Oppositional Letter to MLK

Washington, D.C.

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding voter registration.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Friday, August 30, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), MEXICO, Oregon (OR), Illinois (IL), Texas (TX)

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Belafonte

Wednesday, September 27, 1961
Nashville, TN

This program details a 1961 Harry Belafonte concert sponsored by the SCLC.

Augustine's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
CANADA

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from MLK to Men of Conscience

Friday, March 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes the Men of Conscience at Morehouse College to commend their "group act to find a creative alternative to the military." He assures the group that they have his prayers and support, and expresses hope that he will be able to meet with them soon.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Tuesday, January 15, 1963
PERU, FRANCE

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Letter from Bob Detterick to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Bob Detterick, chairman for "Choice '68" organization at Western New Mexico University, requests that Dr. King send poster, pictures, pamphlets to promote him as the next presidential candidate.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
CANADA, New York, NY

R. Lennox writes a follow-up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak at the annual convocation celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of The Presbyterian College.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah regarding God's grace and mercy.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM, Selma, AL

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. T. Kane

Monday, March 25, 1968
Delaware (DE)

In this letter, dated March 25, 1968, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the Kane's generous contribution of one hundred dollars to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Letter from Rev. Samuel B. McKinney to MLK Regarding Travel Arrangements to Seattle

Monday, November 6, 1961
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Rev. McKinney reviews details regarding Dr. King's itinerary for his visit to Seattle. He mentions that the community has worked exceedingly hard to gain city-wide support for his first visit to the Pacific Northwest.

Rev. P.A. Berry Invites MLK to England

Friday, June 9, 1967
New York, NY

Rev. Quinland R. Gordon informs Dr. King of a recent letter sent to him by Rev. P. A. Berry. Father Berry is interested in securing Dr. King as a guest speaker at his Cathedral in England on Sunday November 12, 1967.

Spring Mobilization Background Material

New York, NY, San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam announces Dr. King as its speaker for their April 15 march. In addition, this document offers background information on the conflict in Vietnam.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

God

Dr. King wrote these notes on the concept of God while reading "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making" by Alfred North Whitehead. He quotes Whitehead, stating that God is the "perpetual vision of the road which leads to the deeper realities."

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.