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Letter from M. Carl Holman to MLK Regarding Event Invitation

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

Mr. Holman informs Dr. King he will soon receive a formal invitation to attend the Commission's National Conference on Race and Education in Washington, D.C. Mr. Holman is sending this advance notice with the hope Dr. King can fit the conference into his schedule.

Letter from Thomas Wilkins to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Thomas Wilkins suggests that Dr. King consider pursuing an initiative against taxation in Alabama. He proposes that any Negro who is refused voter registration should not pay any taxes in the state.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Robert Browning's "Paracelsus."

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Saturday, April 9, 1966

Dr. King expresses his most sincere gratitude for Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock's support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from Patricia M. Shillingburg to Walter Fauntroy

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Patricia M. Shillingburg requests payments that she has yet to recieve upon her release from the SCLC during her assistance with the Harry Belafonte Concert. After making numerous attempts to discover the reason of her release and location of her funds, Ms. Shillingburg informs Rev. Walter Fauntroy that she will take alternative appropriate steps to secure the payment of her services.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Letter from Juanita Kurtza to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Juanita Kurtza sends Dr. King a list of scriptures to encourage him in his work. She also apologizes for her inability to send money.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F.A. Guilford

Monday, September 14, 1964

Dora McDonald expresses Dr. King's delight in knowing that F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press wants to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham Jail." However, she informs Guilford that, due to the letter already being published, it is impossible for a reprint. McDonald refers Guilford to contact Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, for more information.

Letter from Harper & Row, Publishers Regarding Royalties

Friday, October 2, 1964

Harper & Row Publishers write to inform the recipient that they deducted money from an enclosed royalty check due to an outstanding balance for books purchased.

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Letter from B. Hubert Holloman to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963

B. Hubert Holloman asks Dr. King not to bring any more demonstrations to North Carolina, because he feels they lead to hate, violence, and encourage young people to break the law.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

God

Dr. King references God and quotes theologian Paul Tillich from "Systematic Theology: Reason and Revelation."

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

Letter from Robert Balkind to Rev. Abernathy about NAACP

Monday, April 15, 1968

This letter, written by the CEO of Hampton Manufacturing Co., references an attached letter for the NAACP.

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

God

Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."