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Letter from MLK to Dr. James Costar at Michigan State University

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

In this letter to the Chairman of the Department of Counseling and Guidance at Michigan State, Dr. King gives a stellar review of the work of Dr. Robert Green. Dr. King commends Dr. Green's performance in stabilizing the SCLC Citizenship Education Program and expresses appreciation to the university for sharing his expertise.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Evil

Dr. King writes about evil, according to Jeremiah 44: 23.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

Reviews of Strength to Love

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

Letter from Edwina Smith to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Ms. Edwina Smith writes Reverend Shuttlesworth regarding a SCLC meeting and encloses a round trip plane ticket.

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Robert Jacoby

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Reverend Robert Jacoby for his kind letter concerning his use of the Letter From the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

Letter to MLK from Guy Dauncey

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Guy Dauncey, Chairman of the Human Rights Committee at Nottingham University, offered this request for Dr. King to visit England, in March of 1968. The content, within the letter, placed emphasis on special events surrounding "Human Rights Year 1968", to begin a progressive Civil and Human Rights movement in England.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Notes on Atlanta Housing Hearing

Friday, April 10, 1959

This document contains the United States Commission on Civil Rights notes on an Atlanta Housing hearing. The Commission believes that Atlanta will present "new aspects of the problem." The Commission is also collecting information to determine whether equal opportunity in housing is denied due to discrimination. Also included are questions the Commission plans to ask regarding housing.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Idealism

Dr. King cites several statements regarding idealism.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

Telegram from Elizabeth Polste to MLK

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Mrs. Polste writes to Dr. King requesting a tribute for Emily Greene, who is also a Noble Peace Laureate and a founder of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1962

Governor Rockefeller writes Dr. King expressing his support for the work King is doing and asserts his desire to assist him in any way.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

Monday, October 24, 1966

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Exodus

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.

Telegram from George M. Houser to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

In this telegram, dated April 12, 1966, Mr. Houser requests Dr. King's help in leading a march on First National Bank of New York. Due to bank loans to South Africa, several hundred students are showing support by withdrawing their accounts.