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Let My People Vote

New York, NY, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Note - Leewellyn Daniel

The note, shown here, was written by Leewellyn Daniel, of Chicago, Illinois. The handwriting simply states, "Legal action concerning being arrested." However, the addressee of this note and the date it was written is unknown.

Letter from Queen N. Lewis to Coretta Scott King

Monday, April 16, 1956
Detroit, MI

Queen N. Lewis reaches out to Mrs. King to inquire about an upcoming trip to Detroit, Michigan. She mentions that she is a member of a church congregation that donated $1000 to the cause and informs Coretta that there is more she would like to discuss with her at a later date.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

NAACP Fight For Freedom Fund and Awards Dinner

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), California (CA), Maryland (MD), Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Pennsylvania (PA), Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Florida (FL), Kansas (KS), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Washington (WA), New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Texas (TX), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King gives the address at the 1962 NAACP Fight for Freedom Fund and Awards Dinner held at Morehouse College. Coretta Scott King is the soloist.

Suggestions for S.C.L.C.

Dr. King drafts a list of suggestions for the SCLC and lists the contact information for several of the organizations members.

Adverse Letter to MLK

Atlanta, GA

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966
Utah (UT)

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from MLK to Yves Choliere

Friday, July 2, 1965
FINLAND

Dr. King informs Yves Choliere that he is unable to participate in the World Peace Congress in Helsinki, Finland in July of 1965. King explains that he and Reverend Abernathy are very busy with voter registration throughout the American South.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

MLK to Confer in June to Plan Summer Drive Here

Monday, May 29, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Louisville, KY

Referencing Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Bob Modic wrote about an upcoming meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. This meeting was in preparation for the implementation of a campaign to increase employment and housing opportunities for the city's African Americans.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Friday, October 10, 1958
Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY

Eugene Exman sends Dr. King a review of "Stride Toward Freedom" from the New York Times. He also mentions recent orders for the book and planned efforts to increase sales.

Statement by Albert A. Raby

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Albert A. Raby releases a statement denouncing the Illinois State Senate for rejecting an equal housing bill. Mr. Raby calls for a tent-in and rally at the construction site for the proposed Weston plant. Raby cites Illinois is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and that federal funding for the Weston Project be terminated.

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), INDIA, London, England

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

Sin

Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Telegram to Charles Wherry from Frances Lucas

Saturday, November 23, 1968
California (CA)

Frances Lucas writes to Mr. Wherry in Mrs. King's stead thanking him for his kindness and congratulating him on a film project. He also conveys appreciation from Mrs. King for the memorial of her husband at California State College.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

Fight for Open City

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Chicago, IL

Included in The United Council Sentinel, is an excerpt featuring an initiative of Dr. King and various others: Operation Breadbasket. The author explores the details of this specific movement.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Auguste Sabatier's "Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion Based on Psychology and History."

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962
New York (NY)

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Letter from George T. Altman to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Attorney George Altman informs Dr. King of a US District Court order preventing him from taking Dr. King's deposition concerning whether or not people of color should have the same military service requirements as whites. Altman presents the case that people of color were colonial subjects rather than citizens, but the District Court ruled against his position. Altman plans to fight this ruling in an appeal the following month.