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"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Joan Daves to Jose Moya about Spanish edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, August 7, 1964

Here Joan Daves specifies the particulars of negotiations in advances and royalties on the sale of the Spanish edition of "Why We Can't Wait".

South African Victims of Apartheid

Friday, December 10, 1965

The American Committee on Africa hosts a human rights rally and benefit on behalf of the victims of South African Apartheid. This program provides a brief history and overall purpose of the committee and outlines the projected schedule of events.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Kirkpatrick thanks Dr. King for his address at the Assembly in Puerto Rico for the World Convention of Churches of Christ. He also encloses a monetary donation to care for his expenses and serve as an honorarium.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

List of Historical Theologians and Events

Here, Dr. King lists a series of historical theologians and events dating from the second to nineteenth centuries.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Book Sales

Friday, September 4, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves reports the sale figures for royalties and advances of the manuscript "Why We Can't Wait".

Dr. King's Involvement with the Second Emancipation Proclamation

Saturday, March 24, 1962

This article states, Dr. King recently announced President Kennedy has request he submit for his signature a second Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Oppositional Letter to MLK

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention

Monday, August 14, 1967

A program outlining the course of events for the 10th Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

Letter from Frank Annunzio to MLK

Saturday, January 9, 1965

Frank Annunzio informs Dr. King that he appreciates his views on the Mississippi Delegation. Annunzio states that he voted to remove the seniority status of the Mississippi Congressmen "from their respective Committees."

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.