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MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964
Missouri (MO), INDIA

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Press Release: MLK Demands US Action Against Killers of Negroes in Orangeburg, S.C.

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Orangeburg, SC, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's telegram to United States Attorney General Ramsey Carlk was reprinted in this press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In it, Dr. King urges the Justice department to take proper legal action against the perpetrators of violence against Negroes following the wounding and killing of 37 to 50 students in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

An Appreciation Dinner

Monday, December 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This dinner salutes the outstanding service of the SCLC staff. It includes menu items for the gathering as well as a schedule of guest speakers and attendees.

Atheism

Dr. King writes on the topic atheism.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
Pittsburgh, PA

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Elaine Haley to Senator George Murphy

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM, California (CA)

Elaine Haley sends a letter to Senator George Murphy discussing Dr. King's views on riots in relation to ending the Vietnam War.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to the Women's Strike for Peace

Saturday, June 22, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. King writes to the Women's Strike for Peace to extend her appreciation for their support in the area of civil rights.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Monday, April 13, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to The People of Japan

Wednesday, December 13, 1967
JAPAN

Dr. King writes an encouraging letter to the people of Japan expressing his wishes to visit their country sometime soon.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

Detroit, MI, VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965
FRANCE

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

Letter from Pat Mutzberg to Dora McDonald Regarding Meeting

Friday, June 9, 1967
NIGERIA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Pat Mutzberg of the Atlanta Committee for International Visitors writes Miss McDonald to confirm Dr. King's upcoming appointment with Nigerian visitors.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Two Noted Rights Workers Added to Staff of SCEF

New Orleans, LA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains Ella J. Baker and John R. Salter were added to the New Orleans based Southern Christian Educational Fund shortly before its headquarters were raided by more than 100 policemen on October 4th.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Pittsburgh, PA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.