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Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

SCLC and The American Foundation on Nonviolence: Proposal for Housing

The American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC set forth a proposal for low cost self-help housing in Greene County, Alabama.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Monday, September 14, 1964

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Man

Dr. King quotes Proverbs 3:5 on human insight and knowledge and reflects upon its meaning.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Monday, May 29, 1967

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ericson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are expressing their immense support for Dr. King and his humanitarianism. They stress the importance to look beyond the racial lines and focus on a more cohesive world community.

God

Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Letter From Walter J. Benedict to MLK

Sunday, October 29, 1967

Mr. Walter Benedict writes to Dr. King expressing his sympathy for King's incarceration in Birmingham. Benedict plans to show support by fasting and praying during the several days King is in jail.

God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Wrestle of Religion with Truth" on man's need to adjust himself to events.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter to MLK from New York University Professor Philip Zimbardo

Thursday, April 27, 1967

New York University Psychology Professor Philip Zimbardo sends his support to Dr. King.

Telegram from George Woods to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965

George Woods, Vice President of the Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP, telegrams Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit. Woods asks about a rumor being spread that Dr. King would not make the appearance because King was allegedly being hosted by the Quaker Fellowship House. The trip was called off and then rescheduled.

Letter from Debbie Winchester to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

10-year-old Debbie Winchester writes Dr. King requesting an autograph for her collection.