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"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Election of MLK to the Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Friday, January 22, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Charles Merrill and Benjamin E. Mays inform the Morehouse College Board of Trustees of Dr. King's consideration for a seat on the Board to replace Dr. Colwell. This consideration is pending if this election does not cause Judge Elbert P. Tuttle to resign his seat on the Board or disqualify himself as an officer of the U. S. Court of Appeal of the Fifth Circuit.

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

Letter from Rodney Armanie to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Rodney Armanie writes to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959
Atlanta, GA

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Atlantic City, NJ, Michigan (MI), Kentucky (KY)

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
GERMANY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.


Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Letter of Support to MLK

Tuesday, January 18, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Alphia Ganaway and Katherine Oakley send a check as a token of appreciation following Dr. King's appearance in South Bend, Indiana three years earlier. A member of the NAACP and other civic organizations, Ganaway led the effort that brought Dr. King to South Bend on October 18th, 1963.

MLK Endorses Septima Clark's Autobiography

Monday, July 2, 1962

King writes this endorsement of Septima Clark's autobiography"Echo In My Soul," which captured her struggle as a Negro woman in the South. Clark was a prominent civil rights activist considered to be the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement."

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Letter from Wilbert McDonald to MLK regarding Scholarship Assistance

Wednesday, June 9, 1965
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Wilber McDonald requests advice about the development of his educational career from Dr. King.

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Rhode Island (RI)

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Letter from G. P. Beckman to MLK

Thursday, November 3, 1960
Michigan (MI), ITALY

G. P. Beckman writes to Dr. King expressing his appreciation for people of similar faith. He asserts that he loves the black race as a whole and because of this love he does not want his children to grow up and experience similar persecutions.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Ohio (OH), Kentucky (KY)

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Kansas (KS), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964
New York (NY)

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from Peter Mullin to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Peter Mullin of the Gold Key Society of Boston College writes Dr. King informing him of being awarded the Gold Key Award.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.


Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.