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Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Dr. King's Schedule October 1967

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements, October 1967.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Letter from MLK to Brigitte Kirch of Germany

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Dr. King thanks Brigitte Kirch for her encouraging letter.

Royalty Statement re: Why We Can't Wait

Thursday, December 31, 1964

This royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" has an itemization of royalties earned.

A Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Digioia to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Greta B. Digioia expresses how she and her husband have come to know Dr. King as a "symbol" of his race. She then offers Dr. King a one-of-a-kind gift.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Scholarship Essay

Kathleen Lyons, an artist and student from St. Norbert College in Wisconsin, writes this scholarship essay to solicit funds to attend school in Chicago. In the paper, she recounts her experience with art centered civil rights work in Chicago and Wisconsin in various schools, a Native American reservation and a state reformatory. Additionally, Lyons explains that in the summer of 1966 while doing volunteer work in Chicago, she became involved with "Martin Luther King's freedom movement."

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Monday, December 27, 1965

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."

History

Dr. King references a quote from philosopher Hegel regarding the philosophy of history.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Omnipotence

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Adelman

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Adelman's letter, which included a Thomas Babington Macaulay quotation that Dr. King finds still applicable.

Monophysitism

Dr. King distinguishes between monophysitism and the Chalcedonian Creed, which recognizes two natures in Christ.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Antisemitism

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Bernard Hollowood to MLK about Writing an Article

Thursday, July 28, 1966

"Punch" editor Bernard Hollowood asks Dr. King to write an article focusing on the following question: "Is America capable of solving its own race problems?" The article would be part of a series of articles focusing on whether the United States can be trusted as leader of the Western World.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Harris Family

Dr. and Mrs. King send condolences to Katie Harris upon the passing of Alphonso. The Kings remembered Alphonso as "a great and dedicated worker in the struggle for freedom and human dignity."

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

North and South

The SCLC newsletter informs its readers of the recent events that its members have taken part in. Hosea Williams went to Chicago to conduct a voter registration and voter motivation drive. Also, the SCLC's Operation Breadbasket, led by Jesse Jackson, made an agreement with a big food chain company. The company agreed to transfer some accounts from white banks to struggling Negro banks and to offer its Negro customers products manufactured by small Negro firms.

List of SCLC Program Areas

This list briefly outlines the SCLC Program Areas including Voter Registration and Political Education, Citizenship Education, Operation Breadbasket, and Direct Action.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."